Definition of Christian in English:

Christian

Syllabification: Chris·tian
Pronunciation: /ˈkrisCHən
 
/

adjective

1Of, relating to, or professing Christianity or its teachings: the Christian Church
More example sentences
  • Now we may see the great Christian doctrine that in Christ God somehow or other acted to save the world.
  • Be patient and pray earnestly and faithfully for your Christian brother or sister.
  • Ultimately for him, all social planning had to be evaluated in the light of the Christian gospel.
1.1 informal Having or showing qualities associated with Christians, especially those of decency, kindness, and fairness.
More example sentences
  • By this stage Scriven had settled in a part of Ontario and was known for his acts of Christian kindness.
  • He was a very fine young man with a great sense of fairness and Christian compassion.
  • Christian honesty demands that we allow each tradition to tell its own story - the denominational differences are great enough without creating false differences through caricature.

noun

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A person who has received Christian baptism or is a believer in Jesus Christ and his teachings.
More example sentences
  • He found stronger churches manned by keener Christians, and came back encouraged.
  • They are ordinary people who have become Christians by trusting in Jesus Christ.
  • Church is the term for a community of Christians who share a specific set of beliefs.

Origin

late Middle English: from Latin Christianus, from Greek Christianos (see Christ).

Derivatives

Christianization

Pronunciation: /ˌkrisCHənəˈzāSHən/
noun
More example sentences
  • By and large, slave holders through the early nineteenth century were hostile to, suspicious of, or largely indifferent to the Christianization of the enslaved given the religion's egalitarian aspects.
  • In the aftermath of the Spanish-American War in 1898, these Disciples believed America stood poised to play a significant role in the Christianization and elevation of the world.
  • The Anglo-Saxons, Christianized from Rome, Francia, and Ireland, thought they had a duty to evangelize their continental cousins without realizing quite how much Christianization had already taken place.

Christianize

verb
More example sentences
  • In Christianity some want to take over the world and Christianise the government and the people so that after it is done Christ will come back.
  • Stark claims, strikingly, that Scandinavia and Latin America have never been properly Christianized.
  • Lithuania soon became one of the largest kingdoms in medieval Europe and remained pagan despite attempts by the Catholics and the Orthodox church to Christianize it.

Christianly

adverb
More example sentences
  • Neuhaus, in contrast, is firmly convinced that reason can be deployed by Christians to convince non-Christians that they, too, ought to want Christianly desirable things in the public sphere.
  • Our Money & Faith channel includes articles and interviews related to faith and personal finance, while our Faith in the Workplace channel offers articles on living Christianly at work.
  • In this case, the use of the term ‘contextual’ risks falling prey to a sociological tautology, whose indeterminacy allows the word free movement into Christianly unwelcome territories.

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Pronunciation: dɪˈmɒrəlʌɪz
verb
cause (someone) to lose confidence or hope