Definition of Pangloss in English:

Pangloss

Syllabification: Pan·gloss
Pronunciation: /ˈpanɡlôs, -ɡläs
 
/

noun

A person who is optimistic regardless of the circumstances.
More example sentences
  • By the novel's end Pawkie, like a Scottish Pangloss, is announcing that reform is in the air and that the world is becoming better and better.
  • Brad Setser and Nouriel Roubini portray us as modern-day Panglosses for expecting an orderly adjustment of global economic imbalances and sustained U.S. hegemony.
  • One needn't be a Pangloss to dismiss the notion that the world can ever get ‘better.’

Origin

late 18th century: from the name of the tutor and philosopher in Voltaire's Candide (1759).

Derivatives

Panglossian

Pronunciation: /panˈɡlôsēən, -ˈɡläs-/
adjective
More example sentences
  • Like Hammond, Athanasiou argues that the various modes of Panglossian optimism that envisage only win-win scenarios obscure the fact that humanity now faces some tough choices and problems.
  • The Panglossian optimism underpinning such remarks obscures other more serious flaws: To offset the shortfall in domestic savings, the US private sector has been borrowing from abroad.
  • The film suggests that US rehabilitation involves lots of hugs, tears, group chants, and saccharine effusions of Panglossian optimism.

Definition of Pangloss in:

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Pronunciation: ˈnɔɪs(ə)m
adjective
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