Definition of abjure in English:

abjure

Syllabification: ab·jure
Pronunciation: /abˈjo͝or
 
/

verb

[with object] formal
Solemnly renounce (a belief, cause, or claim): his refusal to abjure the Catholic faith
More example sentences
  • I want to look closely at the first lines of the poem, in which Smith seems to abjure any claim of authority.
  • Thus, Muldrow cannot help but abjure spiritual claims to universal enlightenment.
  • To recant is to withdraw or disavow a declared belief, as in renouncing a philosophy or abjuring fealty to a religion.
Synonyms
renounce, relinquish, reject, forgo, disavow, abandon, deny, repudiate, give up, wash one's hands of; eschew, abstain from, refrain from
informal kick, pack in
Lawdisaffirm
literary forsake

Origin

late Middle English: from Latin abjurare, from ab- 'away' + jurare 'swear'.

Phrases

abjure the realm

historical Swear an oath to leave a country or realm forever.
More example sentences
  • If the accused would neither submit to trial nor abjure the realm after 40 days, he was starved into submission.
  • Adam and the others fled to the Church of Branscombe, confessed their crime, and abjured the realm before the coroner.
  • He would be sentenced to abjure the realm or suffer death as a felon.

Derivatives

abjuration

Pronunciation: /ˌabjəˈrāSHən/
noun
More example sentences
  • The dramatic crisis stems from Galileo's enforced abjuration in 1633 of his belief in a heliocentric universe.
  • The Inquisition had accepted Cardano's private abjuration, extracting a promise from him never to teach or publish in the Papal States again.
  • Who speaks these terrible abjurations, Kafka the man or Kafka the artist?

Definition of abjure in:

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