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abominable

Syllabification: a·bom·i·na·ble
Pronunciation: /əˈbäm(ə)nəb(ə)l
 
/

Definition of abominable in English:

adjective

1Causing moral revulsion: the uprising was suppressed with abominable cruelty
More example sentences
  • Lalla, in his opening remarks, told Wellington the prosecution had to be ‘the most vile and most abominable abuse of the prosecutorial process in the country.’
  • And there are certain crimes still that are so heinous, so wretched, and so abominable that, yes, they do cry out for vengeance, and they do cry out for the death penalty.
  • For years now I have been against capital punishment, arguing that killing someone either illegally or legally was the most abominable and most repugnant of crimes.
Synonyms
loathsome, detestable, hateful, odious, obnoxious, despicable, contemptible, damnable, diabolical;
disgusting, revolting, repellent, repulsive, offensive, repugnant, abhorrent, reprehensible, atrocious, horrifying, execrable, foul, vile, wretched, base, horrible, awful, dreadful, appalling, nauseating;
informal terrible, shocking, godawful
dated cursed, accursed
1.1Very bad or unpleasant: a cup of abominable tea
More example sentences
  • And we may venture the guess that Gibbon was disliked perhaps for his liking for that abominable stuff called snuff instead of tea.
  • His abominable muscularity, his loathsome, fluid motion, somehow made me sick.
  • The restaurant also specializes in fresh pasta, which I can heartily recommend as a welcome relief after the abominable over-boiled supermarket pasta that most restaurants here serve.

Origin

Middle English: via Old French from Latin abominabilis, from abominari (see abominate). The term was once widely believed to be from ab- 'away from' + Latin homine (from homo 'human being'), thus 'inhuman, beastly', and frequently spelled abhominable until the 17th century.

More
  • People used to think that abominable came from Latin ab- ‘away from’ and homo ‘human being’, and so literally meant ‘inhuman or beastly’. Consequently, until the 17th century it was frequently spelt abhominable, a spelling found in Shakespeare. In fact, the word comes from Latin abominari, meaning ‘to regard something as a bad omen’, and is related to omen (late 16th century) and ominous (late 16th century). Abominable Snowman is another name for the Himalayan Yeti. The name was brought back by the Royal Geographical Society expedition mounted in 1921 to Mount Everest, which found mysterious footprints in the snow. Abominable Snowman is a translation of Tibetan Meetoh Gangmi, the name the Sherpa porters gave to the animal responsible for the tracks. Yeti is from Tibetan yeh-the ‘little man-like animal’.

Derivatives

abominably

1
adverb
Example sentences
  • She said: ‘We have a rail station at Malton that fails abominably.’
  • He said: ‘It was a very regrettable and something for which he wishes to apologise to the court and to the security staff who were treated abominably by him.’
  • The press has behaved so abominably towards Michael.

Definition of abominable in:

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