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absurd

Syllabification: ab·surd
Pronunciation: /əbˈsərd
 
, əbˈzərd
 
/

Definition of absurd in English:

adjective

1(Of an idea or suggestion) wildly unreasonable, illogical, or inappropriate: the allegations are patently absurd so you think I’m a spy? How absurd! (as noun the absurd) he had a keen eye for the incongruous and the absurd
More example sentences
  • By the end of the programme, it was athletes and fans who hung themselves in public with their own illogical justifications and absurd piety.
  • It is absurd to blame current difficulties on any state's governor, Republican or Democrat.
  • When that happens heads are going to roll even if it happens in such a way so that placing blame is absurd.
Synonyms
1.1(Of a person or a person’s behavior or actions) foolish; unreasonable: she was being absurd—and imagining things
More example sentences
  • She had to fight to keep from laughing at his absurd behavior.
  • Maltin wisely points out that, at the time the cartoon was written, these behaviors were absurd.
  • Running is an absurd sport, for absurd people.
1.2(Of an object or situation) arousing amusement or derision; ridiculous: gym shorts and knee socks looked absurd on such a tall girl
More example sentences
  • In my endless pursuit of funny stories about Eskimo words for snow, I've found friends who will send me absurd comics about it, too.
  • The result is a mixed platter: Hilariously absurd one minute, farcically annoying the next, and damn surreal all of the time.
  • It has become overpriced, overrated and overrun with ridiculous people who live absurd lives.

Origin

mid 16th century: from Latin absurdus 'out of tune', hence 'irrational'; related to surdus 'deaf, dull'.

More
  • One sense of the Latin word absurdus was ‘out of tune’, and in the past absurd was occasionally used with this meaning. From this Latin sense it developed the meaning ‘out of harmony with reason, irrational’. The term Theatre of the Absurd, describing drama by writers such as Samuel Beckett ( 1906–1989), Eugène Ionesco ( 1904–1994), and Harold Pinter ( 1930–2008), was coined by the critic Martin Esslin ( 1918–2002) in 1961.

Derivatives

absurdly

1
adverb
Example sentences
  • This list wasn't originally intended for a quiz so some are absurdly easy and others impossibly hard.
  • The contempt and indifference for her own child, which she continually voices, is absurdly unbelievable.
  • It also sets an absurdly high standard of perfection for market performance.

Definition of absurd in:

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