Definition of adjure in English:

adjure

Syllabification: ad·jure
Pronunciation: /əˈjo͝or
 
/

verb

[with object] formal
Urge or request (someone) solemnly or earnestly to do something: I adjure you to tell me the truth
More example sentences
  • It is in this light that Romans 13 adjures people to obey the powers that be.
  • Some thirty-five years ago, when I was a newcomer to the United States, an American friend adjured me to respect the meaning of the word as humbug and not to confuse it with the word for nonsense.
  • Before the start of my first day here, a representative from the Ontario Teachers' Federation flagged down a group of us and adjured us to refuse to mark the test.

Origin

late Middle English (in the sense 'put a person on oath'): from Latin adjurare, from ad- 'to' + jurare 'swear' (from jus, jur- 'oath').

Derivatives

adjuration

Pronunciation: /ˌajəˈrāSHən/
noun
More example sentences
  • Now, various complaints and adjurations were made by the letter-writers.
  • Moreover, the effect of the Master's adjurations seems in fact to be that Calverley has abandoned any thoughts of Christianity at all, since he immediately invokes the conspicuously pagan concept of Fate.
  • Perhaps the adjurations are against confining the remedial provisions by reference to common law doctrines and limitations.

adjuratory

Pronunciation: /-əˌtôrē/
adjective
More example sentences
  • There is a certain degree of grumpiness to the vocals, and yet they sound adjuratory.
  • The emphasis will be on legislative, adjuratory and general policy-making process of administrative agencies.
  • Conciliation is a consensual process where litigation and arbitration are adjuratory processes in which parties have no control on the outcome of the dispute or the process.

Definition of adjure in:

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