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adverse

Syllabification: ad·verse
Pronunciation: /adˈvərs
 
, ˈadˌvərs
 
/

Definition of adverse in English:

adjective

Preventing success or development; harmful; unfavorable: taxes are having an adverse effect on production adverse weather conditions
More example sentences
  • Despite the adverse blustery weather conditions, it was clear that Oxford had the edge.
  • The development will not have any adverse effect upon bats or other wildlife living in the area.
  • She said the development would have major adverse impacts on the beauty of the landscape.
Synonyms

Origin

late Middle English: from Old French advers, from Latin adversus 'against, opposite', past participle of advertere, from ad- 'to' + vertere 'to turn'. Compare with averse.

More
  • verse from (Old English):

    In his poem ‘Digging’ ( 1966), Seamus Heaney resolves to carry on the family tradition of digging the soil by ‘digging’ himself, not with a spade like his father and grandfather, but with a pen. The link between agriculture and writing poetry goes all the way back to the origin of the word verse, as Latin versus meant both ‘a turn of the plough, furrow’ and ‘a line of writing’. The idea here is that of a plough turning and marking another straight line or furrow. Versus is also the source of versatile (early 17th century) and version (Late Middle English), and it is based on Latin vertere ‘to turn’, from which vertebra (early 17th century), vertical (mid 16th century), vertigo (Late Middle English), and many other words such as adverse (Late Middle English), convert (Late Middle English), and pervert (Late Middle English) ‘turn bad’. Vortex (mid 17th century) is closely related. Versed (early 17th century), as in well versed in, is different, coming from Latin versari ‘be engaged in’.

Usage

Adverse meanshostile, unfavorable, opposed,’ and is usually applied to situations, conditions, or events—not to people: the dry weather has had an adverse effect on the garden. Averse is related in origin and also has the sense of ‘opposed,’ but is usually employed to describe a person’s attitude: I would not be averse to making the repairs myself. See also averse (usage).

Derivatives

adversely

1
adverb
Example sentences
  • Public servants are used to being compared, adversely, with the private sector.
  • The unity and character of our village has been adversely affected.
  • It will all come down to what is sustainable and what will not impact adversely on the park's fauna and flora.

Words that rhyme with adverse

universeobverse

Definition of adverse in:

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