There are 3 main definitions of affect in English:

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affect1

Syllabification: af·fect
Pronunciation: /əˈfekt
 
/

verb

[with object]
1Have an effect on; make a difference to: the dampness began to affect my health [with clause]: your attitude will affect how successful you are
More example sentences
  • Differences in environment or health status may affect how people respond to subjective assessments.
  • This is beginning to affect how the law determines which of these relationships should be given legal recognition.
  • The effects of the hunger affected each of their kind differently.
Synonyms
have an effect on, influence, act on, work on, have an impact on, impact;
change, alter, modify, transform, form, shape, sway, bias
1.1Touch the feelings of (someone); move emotionally: the atrocities he witnessed have affected him most deeply
More example sentences
  • We all collude in the anticipation of a fatal outcome, even if we are emotionally affected or shaken when it occurs.
  • Take their feelings to heart, too-this move affects everybody.
  • He's the only person in Brighton who affects me emotionally; everyone else I know is wonderful, and easy.
Synonyms
move, touch, make an impression on, hit (hard), tug at someone's heartstrings;
upset, trouble, distress, disturb, agitate, shake (up)
stirring, soul-stirring, heartwarming;

Origin

late Middle English (in the sense 'attack as a disease'): from French affecter or Latin affect- 'influenced, affected', from the verb afficere (see affect2).

Usage

Affect and effect are both verbs and nouns, but only effect is common as a noun, usually meaning ‘a result, consequence, impression, etc.’: my father’s warnings had no effect on my adventurousness. The noun affect is restricted almost entirely to psychology (see affect3). As verbs, they are used differently. Affect most commonly means ‘produce an effect on, influence’: smoking during pregnancy can affect the baby’s development. Affect also meanspretend to have or feel (something)’ (see affect2): she affected a concern for those who had lost their jobs. Effect meansbring about’: the negotiators effected an agreement despite many difficulties.

Definition of affect in:

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There are 3 main definitions of affect in English:

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affect2

Syllabification: af·fect
Pronunciation: /əˈfekt
 
/

verb

[with object]
1Pretend to have or feel (something): as usual I affected a supreme unconcern [with infinitive]: a book that affects to loathe the modern world
More example sentences
  • Although the author affects befuddlement, his book demonstrates an unfaltering sense of self.
  • The boy then sat on top of the pillow, affecting an air of supreme indifference.
  • One can affect unawareness, feign indifference or summon up some other defense against such entreaties.
Synonyms
pretend, feign, fake, simulate, make a show of, make a pretense of, sham
informal put on, make like
1.1Use, wear, or assume (something) pretentiously or so as to make an impression on others: an American who had affected a British accent
More example sentences
  • He has enough shirt buttons undone to wear a medallion, but instead affects a necklace.
  • Sometimes you become very aware that you're watching an actor affecting crazy mannerisms in a crazy movie.
  • Her haughty tone affected the third voice, giving him the impression that she was annoyed.
Synonyms
assume, take on, adopt, embrace, espouse

Origin

late Middle English: from French affecter or Latin affectare 'aim at', frequentative of afficere 'work on, influence', from ad- 'at, to' + facere 'do'. The original sense was 'like, love', hence '(like to) use, assume, etc'.

Definition of affect in:

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There are 3 main definitions of affect in English:

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affect3

Syllabification: af·fect
Pronunciation: /ˈafekt
 
, əˈfekt
 
/

noun

Psychology
Emotion or desire, especially as influencing behavior or action.
Example sentences
  • By triggering affect and emotion, intolerant behaviors are set in motion.
  • We have come a long way from Freud's affect theory to viewing emotions as joining and integrating minds.
  • This, says Jung, is because they confuse feeling with emotion or affect.

Origin

late 19th century: coined in German from Latin affectus 'disposition', from afficere 'to influence' (see affect2).

Derivatives

affectless

1
adjective
Example sentences
  • Watson's descriptions of his encounters with these women is affectless and somehow totally centered about his own ego.
  • The affectless voyeurism and exhibitionism of reality TV has undoubtedly inspired the movie.
  • His expression was bland and grim and affectless.

affectlessness

2
noun
Example sentences
  • Sherman's declamatory vocals add a precise note of affectlessness to his incisive lyrics about romantic dislocation.
  • Both the exhilaration and the hollow affectlessness of everything that follows proceed directly from this game plan.
  • And the movie's weird mixture of moralism and affectlessness cancel each other out.

Definition of affect in:

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