Definition of alleviate in English:

alleviate

Syllabification: al·le·vi·ate
Pronunciation: /əˈlēvēˌāt
 
/

verb

[with object]

Derivatives

alleviation

Pronunciation: /əˌlēvēˈāSHən/
noun
More example sentences
  • And self-control brings alleviation of debt, peace of mind, and ultimate happiness.
  • With foreign investment, there would be job creation, economic growth and above all, poverty alleviation for the people.
  • With both procedures the patient experiences alleviation of the symptoms of Parkinson's Disease.

alleviator

Pronunciation: /-ˌātər/
noun
More example sentences
  • The Lyonnaise poutine is one of the best hangover alleviators I've ever tried: thick, rough-cut fries, a very pungent peppercorn sauce, curds of squeaky-fresh cheese, fried ground beef and thinly sliced onions.
  • Drug use becomes more attractive as an alleviator of stress and strain and as a means of escape from a harsh reality.
  • Also not a brand-new offering, this company offers herbal alternatives in the form of sunblock, bug repellent, muscle pain alleviator, and poison oak and ivy soap.

Origin

late Middle English: from late Latin alleviat- 'lightened', from the verb alleviare, from Latin allevare, from ad- 'to' + levare 'raise', influenced by levis 'light'.

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Pronunciation: grəʊˈtɛskəri
noun
grotesque quality or grotesque things collectively