Definition of aporia in English:

aporia

Syllabification: a·po·ri·a
Pronunciation: /əˈpôrēə
 
/

noun

1An irresolvable internal contradiction or logical disjunction in a text, argument, or theory: the celebrated aporia whereby a Cretan declares all Cretans to be liars
More example sentences
  • But it will never repay a certain kind of close reading, that which is in vogue today and looks for aporias, fissures, self-subversions, and the rest of the deconstructionist's tool-kit.
  • Sublimity is a complex of undecidables and aporias of which Levi-narrator is only partially aware and which is often in an adversarial relation to his stated intentions.
  • Hence the book is embroiled in a number of aporias: between seeing and telling, between self and other, and between event and discourse.
1.1 Rhetoric The expression of doubt.
More example sentences
  • We already know synchronic and diachronic are out - but what of aporia and synecdoche?
  • The figure of aporia, after all, can foreground the significance of the very subject the speaker expresses doubt about how to approach.
  • Brian Henry, a younger poet, shares with Palmer a fascination with negativity, absence and aporia.

Origin

mid 16th century: via late Latin from Greek, from aporos 'impassable', from a- 'without' + poros 'passage'.

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Word of the day abjure
Pronunciation: əbˈdʒʊə
verb
solemnly renounce (a belief, cause, or claim)