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attune

Syllabification: at·tune
Pronunciation: /əˈt(y)o͞on
 
/

Definition of attune in English:

verb

[with object] (usually be attuned)
1Make receptive or aware: a society more attuned to consumerism than ideology (as adjective attuned) the department is very attuned politically
More example sentences
  • The Bochum Symphony Orchestra are attuned to these overtly romantic pieces and both soloists are also top class interpreters.
  • The 1930s thrillers seem more politically aware and attuned to their times.
  • What he has delivered is a powerful and solid opera, beautifully attuned to the expectations of its audience, challenging but never going too far, involving and magical.
1.1Accustom or acclimatize: students are not attuned to making decisions
More example sentences
  • Intelligence tools, furthermore, must be attuned to geographic conditions.
  • This means education systems and economic structures that are attuned to, and can adapt to, global technological innovations.
  • Said Jeff, ‘… I am pretty elderly myself and I do not feel a need for a firearm especially attuned to my aging condition.’
Synonyms
accustom, adjust, adapt, acclimatize, condition, accommodate, assimilate;
acclimate
1.2 [no object] Become receptive to or aware of: a conscious attempt to attune to the wider audience
More example sentences
  • But when I get in touch with another religion, and I attune to their dimension of the holy, I can bring that attunement back and enhance my connection
  • Typically, it is the mother who learns to read and attune to the baby, so the child has less need to develop these skills in his/her relationship with her.
  • Our cells are beginning to reorganize, restructure, and attune to the higher vibratory frequency.
1.3Make harmonious: the interests of East and West are now closely attuned
More example sentences
  • Professionally, the men are clearly closely attuned.
  • Although the three were not ideally attuned, they brought a gentle whiff of nostalgia to a season of high-keyed dance.

Origin

late 16th century: from at- + tune.

Definition of attune in:

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seeking to emulate someone or something