Definition of augur in English:

augur

Syllabification: au·gur
Pronunciation: /ˈôgər
 
/

verb

[no object] (augur well/badly/ill)
1(Of an event or circumstance) portend a good or bad outcome: the end of the Cold War seemed to augur well the return to the gold standard augured badly for industry
More example sentences
  • He said that both sides' willingness to talk augured well for a peaceful outcome.
  • Indeed, to have an operation begin with a helicopter crash does not augur well for its outcome.
  • Those events certainly did not augur well for the success of the project.
1.1 [with object] Portend or bode (a specified outcome): a new coalition would not augur a new period of social reforms
More example sentences
  • The move augurs disaster for pastoralism in the sub-continent, it is a mode of violence against the lives and livelihoods of several thousand rural households.
  • Perhaps it augurs a return to the epicene male fashion of Genji's time.
  • Lee does not reckon that much concrete will emerge from the summit but, she adds, ‘I am certain it will augur a new mood in North Korea.’
1.2 [with object] archaic Foresee or predict.
More example sentences
  • Of course, they augured stuff by poking around in crow guts too, so that's how much they knew.

noun

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(In ancient Rome) a religious official who observed natural signs, especially the behavior of birds, interpreting these as an indication of divine approval or disapproval of a proposed action.
More example sentences
  • In the case of the augurs or haruspices of Rome, the animal was sacrificed to permit contemplation of the entrails for prophetic purposes.
  • People called augurs could also be found in the temples.
  • Appropriately, with his head veiled he had the omens taken on the Capitoline Hill, accompanied by augurs and priests, and received the requested signs.

Origin

late Middle English (as a noun): from Latin, 'diviner'.

Derivatives

augural

Pronunciation: /ˈôgyərəl/
adjective
( archaic )
More example sentences
  • The statue clearly indicates that Marsyas, the teacher of augural practice of auspices, arrived in Italy from Asia Minor.
  • Why, we might ask, would the Princeps desire to eliminate any traces of the traditional augural function of this minor deity?

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