Definition of avulsion in English:

avulsion

Syllabification: a·vul·sion
Pronunciation: /əˈvəlSHən
 
/

noun

chiefly Medicine
  • 1The action of pulling or tearing away.
    More example sentences
    • Other etiologies of groin pain include sports hernia, groin disruption, iliopsoas bursitis, stress fractures, avulsion fractures, nerve compression and snapping hip syndrome.
    • The athlete commonly presents to the physician with a chronic untreated profundus avulsion.
    • Treatment using nail avulsion in combination with topical therapy has been somewhat more successful, but this approach can be time-consuming, temporarily disabling and painful.
  • 1.1 Law The sudden separation of land from one property and its attachment to another, especially by flooding or a change in the course of a river. Compare with alluvion.
    More example sentences
    • Abandonment of a former course through avulsion and meander-loop cut-off produces many lakes.
    • Avulsion in a coastal area, of course, simply destroys property and moves the boundary, as there is no opposite bank to gain.
    • Ohio Revised Code (Law) states that land lost by erosion but regained by avulsion, reverts ownership back to the upland property owner.

Derivatives

avulse

Pronunciation: /əˈvəls/
verb
More example sentences
  • For this reason, great pains are taken to ensure that the dry creek bed is properly prepared to receive the flow of the tributary now avulsing over the alluvial fan.
  • At Westminster, he played rugby, and when a scrum collapsed, he avulsed a spinous process, very painful, but he was able to claim later that he had ‘broken his back.’
  • The worst injury he had seen since he started at Heiwa had been a nearly avulsed finger that had been slammed in a closed door by a careless gentleman who had let the good news of his engagement get the better of him.

Origin

early 17th century: from Latin avulsion-, from the verb avellere, from ab- 'from' + vallere 'pluck'.

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