There are 3 definitions of bail in English:

bail1

Syllabification: bail
Pronunciation: /bāl
 
/

noun

1The temporary release of an accused person awaiting trial, sometimes on condition that a sum of money be lodged to guarantee their appearance in court: he has been released on bail
More example sentences
  • The defendants were released on bail at Cork District Court yesterday for sentencing on February 15.
  • A Kirkwall man was released on bail from Kirkwall Sheriff Court on Tuesday after pleading guilty to assault and breach of the peace.
  • Howley was charged with the first of these alleged offences on Friday - two days after he was released on bail from Kirkwall Sheriff Court for a catalogue of admitted crimes.
1.1Money paid for the release an accused person as security.
More example sentences
  • His family today confirmed they cannot pay the five million drachma bail money which has been set by the judges presiding over his case.
  • The great grandson of the famed make-up artist was supposed to be wearing an electronic tracking device while free on $1 million bail.
  • If one of the world's most famous entertainers did not show up in one hour, he would be sent to jail, losing $3 million bail.

verb

[with object] (usually be bailed) Back to top  
Release or secure the release of (a prisoner) on payment of bail: his son called home to get bailed out of jail See also bail out at bail3.
More example sentences
  • Prisoners being bailed to return to the station will also be dealt with separately from those being kept in custody.
  • He was bailed to appear at Swadlincote Magistrates' Court on 12 th October.
  • We see no necessity for a defendant who is bailed to be expressly warned that, if he absconds, he may be tried in his absence, for that has been the English common law for over a century.

Origin

Middle English: from Old French, literally 'custody, jurisdiction', from Old French bailler 'take charge of', from Latin bajulare 'bear a burden'.

Phrases

jump bail

informal Fail to appear for trial after being released on bail: he jumped bail and was on the run until his arrest
More example sentences
  • When both of them are set after the same slimy car thief who has jumped bail things get out of hand.
  • An east Yorkshire man who jumped bail after being arrested for drug smuggling eight years ago was jailed for six months yesterday.
  • He jumped bail right after the murders and was on the lamb for more than 20 years.

go bail (or stand bail)

Act as surety for an accused person.
More example sentences
  • The men were taken to Inverness and held without trial, but Highlanders from all over Scotland rallied to their cause, standing bail for them and eventually paying their fines.
  • In the original classical legend it is Phintias (of which ‘Pythias’ is a corruption), not Damon, who is sentenced, and Damon goes bail for him.
  • He cannot speak of integrity and loyalty when he did not even appear to stand bail for the No 1 couple in this country, Mr and Mrs Panday.

post bail

Pay a sum of money as bail: I posted bail for him
More example sentences
  • The construction worker was arrested and released after posting bail.
  • So when his family posted bail after several months of pretrial detention, Tyson went looking for a reporter.
  • The two were taken into custody after failing to post bail of 50 million Nepalese rupees each, the reports said.

Derivatives

bailable

adjective
More example sentences
  • Why is it so easy for a judge to issue a bailable warrant for arrest, before any investigation has been conducted into the charges against the accused?
  • No bail must be granted for non bailable offences.
  • The People's Forum has welcomed the announcement by the Vice-President that Cabinet has approved amendment of the law relating to theft of motor vehicles to make the offence bailable.

Definition of bail in:

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Word of the day glee
Pronunciation: gliː
noun
great delight, especially from one's own good fortune…

There are 3 definitions of bail in English:

bail2

Syllabification: bail
Pronunciation: /
 
bāl/

noun

1A bar that holds something in place, in particular.
More example sentences
  • We went back out to the middle, took a light reading and removed the bails.
  • Pull wire signal arm (bail arm) down to start ice making.
  • The curl of the bail secures the bail end in the ear and the continuing curl avoids any puncturing of the adjacent side wall of the pail.
1.1 Fishing A bar that guides fishing line on a reel.
More example sentences
  • I was going to fish with an open bail arm so there was no need for bait runners.
  • If choosing a front rest indicator make sure it is a type that works well with an open bail arm.
  • For the indication on the line, nothing could be more simple, use a lemon squeezy bottle top which hangs on the line below the open bail arm.
1.2A bar on a typewriter or computer printer that holds the paper steady.
More example sentences
  • The bail arm on this printer raises whilst the machine is printing.
  • Pull the bail arm toward the front of the printer.
  • If not, it will catch on the bail arm as it advances.
1.3 Mountaineering A bar on a crampon that fits into a groove in the sole of a boot.
More example sentences
  • If you are using the bail rings, you'll want to sew a loop in each end of the strap.
  • The Sabretooths are step-in crampons with stainless-steel heel and toe bails, which make them a breeze to put on with popsicle fingers at midnight.
  • They may have grooves at front and back for crampon toe bails and heel clamps.
1.4A bar separating horses in an open stable.
More example sentences
  • These rugged buckets feature a reinforced bail attachment.
  • It has a one piece metal ring around the parameter in which the bail is connected.
2An arched handle, such as on a bucket or a teapot: [as modifier]: drawers fitted with brass bail handles
More example sentences
  • Made of highly figured mahogany it retains its original large brass bail handles and keyhole escutcheons.
  • An optional bail arm handle is also available.
  • This bail handle combines a cast handle with filigree forged rosettes.
3 (usually bails) Cricket Either of the two crosspieces bridging the stumps, which the bowler and fielders try to dislodge with the ball to get the batsman out.
More example sentences
  • The globe is presented in the form of a stylised cricket ball while the columns, styled as stumps and bails, represent the three essential pillars of the game - batting, bowling and fielding.
  • But something was wrong with the picture - the bails remained firmly on the wicket, despite the leaning leg stump.
  • Only then did the umpires march out, remove the bails and stumps, and declare that England had won the Ashes.

Origin

Middle English (denoting the outer wall of a castle): from Old French baile 'palisade, enclosure', baillier 'enclose', perhaps from Latin baculum 'rod, stick'. Compare with bailey.

Definition of bail in:

There are 3 definitions of bail in English:

bail3

Syllabification: bail
Pronunciation: /
 
bāl/

verb

1 [with object] Scoop water out of (a ship or boat): the first priority is to bail out the boat with buckets
More example sentences
  • Until that happens, its like bailing a leaky boat to stay ahead of rising cost.
  • When they arrived, the sailors helped to bale out the 26 foot vessel and they were able to identify the cause of the problem as a leaking cooling pipe which was letting in the sea.
  • Working deep in the hold we find the faithful ones who keep bailing the bilges without regard for the Mate's view on whether they should be doing it or not.
1.1Scoop (water) out of a ship or boat: I started to use my hands to bail out the water
More example sentences
  • The waves were big and they broke into the boat, but we managed to bail out the water.
  • Despite taking on water and having to bail all the way, the trip took only a week.
  • Marvin started bailing with an oil can while Frankie stood up, machete in hand.
2 [no object] Abandon a commitment, obligation, or responsibility: after 12 years of this, including Sunday Mass with the family, I bailed
More example sentences
  • Quitters bail regardless of responsibility, commitment or timing, right?
  • Are you bailing because you're scared of commitment?
  • Chuck bails around the 2: 00 mark to avoid the stinkface.
2.1 (bail on) North American informal Let (someone) down by failing to fulfill a commitment, obligation, or responsibility: he looks a little like the guy who bailed on me
More example sentences
  • Anyways… I'm still sorry about bailing on you guys at lunch… except well, Simon was there.
  • Guys who bail on a workout program conveniently allow themselves to forget why they started one in the first place.
  • Many noted that while the company had closed fewer than 40 stores in its 40-year history, it was closing a store in a similar part of Detroit on the same day it was bailing on the Hawthorne neighborhood.

Origin

early 17th century: from obsolete bail 'bucket', from French baille, based on Latin bajulus 'carrier'.

Phrasal verbs

bail out

(Of a member of an aircrew) make an emergency parachute descent from an aircraft; eject.
More example sentences
  • Chief Arp asked the pilot for parachutes so we could bail out.
  • When a young airman miraculously survives bailing out of his aeroplane without a parachute, he falls in love with an American radio operator.
  • It was just like in the movies when the Corsair takes a hit from the Zero, and the aircraft trails smoke just before the pilot bails out - except we didn't have parachutes, and this wasn't a movie.
Become free of an obligation or commitment; discontinue an activity: she felt ready to bail out of the corporate rat race
More example sentences
  • Because now he's done the time, Joe is ready to bail out of EastEnders and try his hand at something other than quivering his bottom lip and having bad facial hair.
  • Given the political realities, anyone under the age of 50 should be agitating to bail out of the sinking ship and obtain the right to save money, rather than relying on the whims of the political process.
  • Should I bail out of this line right now, or should I stick it out a bit longer and hope that the lady finds a working credit-card soon?

bail someone/something out

Release someone or something from a difficulty; rescue: the state will not bail out loss-making enterprises
More example sentences
  • For his part, the defendant repeatedly proclaimed his innocence, insisting he had dug deep into his own pockets to bail the church out of financial difficulties.
  • Desmond had bailed him out of financial difficulties by lending him £46,000.
  • Residential ratepayers, taxpayers, and employees are thus to bail the industry out of its difficulties.
Synonyms
rescue, save, relieve; finance, help (out), assist, aid
informal save someone's bacon/neck/skin

Derivatives

bailer

noun
More example sentences
  • He has been driving through the flooded River Derwent with passengers sitting on straw bailers in the trailer.
  • The freshly mown hay lies in the hot sun waiting for the bailer to make bales and be done.
  • My Dad would follow behind with the square hay bailer and he would bail the hay.

Definition of bail in: