There are 4 main definitions of bale in English:

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bale1

Syllabification: bale
Pronunciation: /bāl
 
/

noun

1A bundle of paper, hay, cotton, etc., tightly wrapped and bound with cords or hoops: the fire destroyed 500 bales of hay
More example sentences
  • Firefighters remained at the scene through the night and throughout yesterday tackling small pockets of fire in the bales of paper.
  • The bales of stamped paper remained unpacked at Castle William; no man being bound to open and distribute them.
  • Meanwhile, they burned crops, destroyed railroads and factories and reached Savannah with 25,000 bales of captured cotton.
Synonyms
bundle, bunch, pack, package, parcel
1.1The quantity in a bale as a measure, especially 500 pounds of cotton.
Example sentences
  • Calculating a ton as 40 bales weighing 50 pounds each, the price per bale would range from $2.25 to $3.80.
  • Top cotton yields this year reached three bales - or about 1,500 pounds - per acre, Latham said, with 45,000 acres planted.
  • At the Slaton Co-Op, the 500-pound bales continue to roll out.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
Make (something) into bales: they baled a lot of good hay (as noun baling) most baling and field work have been finished
More example sentences
  • On the other hand, if you want to plow a field, bale hay, pull stumps or exchange implements with neighbors, you'll need a more powerful machine.
  • In North Carolina, I did my laundry and hung it outside on a clothesline to dry, while a farmer baled hay in a field next door.
  • I baled hay and pulled weeds from soybean fields.

Origin

Middle English: probably from Middle Dutch, from Old French; ultimately of Germanic origin and related to ball1.

More
  • bail from (Middle English):

    The spelling bail represents several different words. The one meaning ‘temporary release of an accused person’ came via French from Latin bajulare, ‘to bear a burden’, and is related to bailiff (Middle English), someone who bears the burden of responsibility. The Latin word is also ultimately the source of bail (in Britain also spelled bale) meaning ‘to scoop water out of a boat’. The bailey (Middle English) or outer wall of a castle has a quite different origin, but it is connected with the third bail, a crosspiece on a cricket stump: originally this bail meant the same as bailey. The ultimate origin of both of these appears to be Latin baculum, ‘a rod or stick’ which developed the sense ‘palisade’ in French. Bailing out from an aircraft may be a development of the ‘to scoop water’ sense. It was at first spelled bale out, though, and could come from the idea of letting a bale of straw though a trapdoor in a barn. The first written record dates from 1930. This sort of bale (Middle English) has the basic idea of something bundled and is related to ball.

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There are 4 main definitions of bale in English:

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bale2

Syllabification: bale
Pronunciation: /bāl
 
/

noun

archaic or literary
1Evil considered as a destructive force.
Example sentences
  • In earlier days great Carthage suffered bale.
  • Enough and to spare of bale is in thy speech.
1.1Evil suffered; physical torment or mental suffering.
Example sentences
  • Let now your bliss be turned into bale.
  • I have known too much of bale by this child-bearing.

Origin

Old English balu, bealu, of Germanic origin.

More
  • bail from (Middle English):

    The spelling bail represents several different words. The one meaning ‘temporary release of an accused person’ came via French from Latin bajulare, ‘to bear a burden’, and is related to bailiff (Middle English), someone who bears the burden of responsibility. The Latin word is also ultimately the source of bail (in Britain also spelled bale) meaning ‘to scoop water out of a boat’. The bailey (Middle English) or outer wall of a castle has a quite different origin, but it is connected with the third bail, a crosspiece on a cricket stump: originally this bail meant the same as bailey. The ultimate origin of both of these appears to be Latin baculum, ‘a rod or stick’ which developed the sense ‘palisade’ in French. Bailing out from an aircraft may be a development of the ‘to scoop water’ sense. It was at first spelled bale out, though, and could come from the idea of letting a bale of straw though a trapdoor in a barn. The first written record dates from 1930. This sort of bale (Middle English) has the basic idea of something bundled and is related to ball.

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There are 4 main definitions of bale in English:

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bale3

Line breaks: bale

Entry from British & World English dictionary

verb

British
Variant spelling of bail3.

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There are 4 main definitions of bale in English:

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Bâle4

Syllabification: Bâle
Pronunciation: /bäl
 
/
French name for Basle.

Definition of bale in:

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