There are 3 main definitions of bark in English:

bark1

Syllabification: bark
Pronunciation: /bärk
 
/

noun

1The sharp explosive cry of certain animals, especially a dog, fox, or seal.
More example sentences
  • As I tucked into this steaming Bunter-sized platter out on the darkening waters, I swear I heard the seals give a loud bark of disapproval.
  • In general, vocalizations are varied and include: trumpeting, whistles, twitters, honks, barks, grunts, quacks, croaks and growls.
  • As soon as the click of key-in-lock was heard Melanie's sharp barks followed.
Synonyms
1.1A sound resembling a sharp explosive cry, typically one made by someone laughing or coughing: a short bark of laughter
More example sentences
  • The Prince laughed, if the humorless barks of sound could really be called laughter.
  • A small bark of laughter sounded from her lips, and she turned to flash a small smile.
  • The guys all elicited little coughs to hide their barks of laughter especially after they saw the look on Chantal's face.

verb

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1 [no object] (Of a dog or other animal) emit a bark: a dog barked at her
More example sentences
  • The dog barked at the cat and made to steal the cat's food.
  • As I walked past, the dogs barked at me, and one lunged at me and bit me on the leg.
  • The dog barked at the girl, baring it's canines threateningly at her.
Synonyms
1.1(Of a person) make a sound, such as a cough or a laugh, resembling a bark: she barked with laughter
More example sentences
  • So we're staying at the Waldorf which is crammed with business people barking into mobile phones.
  • The two hours sat listening to an orchestra of mobile phones, into which people barked: ‘I'm stuck on the train’ were enlightening.
  • There have been a few people barking about the trees that were chopped down in Jordan's Castle.
2 [with object] Utter (a command or question) abruptly or aggressively: he began barking out his orders [with direct speech]: “Nobody is allowed up here,” he barked [no object]: he was barking at me to make myself presentable
More example sentences
  • His boss is a brutish oaf who barks orders and commands with little care for his employee's dignity.
  • Then, Leslie barked some command, and we all started doing ‘side steps’.
  • Unseen in the Vancouver dugout, manager Jack McKeon barked commands into a transmitter.
Synonyms
say brusquely, say abruptly, say angrily, snap;
informal holler
2.1 [no object] US Call out in order to sell or advertise something: doormen bark at passersby, promising hot music and cold beer
More example sentences
  • As the band lets the dueling guitars heat up, Johnson barks like a flea market pitchman, bargaining with wary shoppers for humanism and attention.
  • A"Step right up to the Shootin' Corral fellas, first shot's for free!" he had barked in a greasy rasp at cringing fair-goers who tried to creep by his booth unnoticed,
  • From a colourful assortment of fruits, vegetables, fish and meats to vendors barking about bargains for anybody who will listen.

Origin

Old English beorc (noun), beorcan (verb), of Germanic origin; possibly related to break.

Phrases

someone's bark is worse than their bite

Someone is not as ferocious as they appear or sound.
More example sentences
  • While we'd never suggest that council meetings become dogfights, at Tuesday's Richmond Valley Council Cr Robert Mustow proved his bark is worse than his bite.
  • She smiled, ‘One of the things he mentioned is that your bark is worse than your bite.’
  • Oh, don't mind him, dear, his bark is worse than his bite.

be barking up the wrong tree

informal Be pursuing a mistaken or misguided line of thought or course of action.
More example sentences
  • ‘Countries, including Jamaica, are barking up the wrong tree if they expect continuation of preferential treatment in a time of increased competition among states,’ said the Jamaica Gleaner.
  • If they don't look at that seriously, we were barking up the wrong tree.
  • ‘This would allow people to ring up newspapers and tell them they were barking up the wrong tree, should apologise and should not publish the information,’ said the Mr Kaufman.

Definition of bark in:

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There are 3 main definitions of bark in English:

bark2

Syllabification: bark
Pronunciation: /bärk
 
/

noun

1The tough, protective outer sheath of the trunk, branches, and twigs of a tree or woody shrub.
More example sentences
  • Being leaf eaters, they eat a great deal of leaves, fruits, twigs, and tree bark; they have chambered stomachs.
  • On the outer bark of the tree are brown spots, said to resemble the rust spots of nails.
  • I started to look on the ground around the tree for fallen bark and branches, and what I saw was a veritable goldmine of wood that would be just the thing for the huts.
Synonyms
rind, skin, peel, covering;
cork
technical cortex
1.1The bark of a tree used for tanning leather, making dyestuffs, or as a mulch in gardening.
More example sentences
  • After that, because the soil level usually sinks a little during the growing season, I top it off in late winter with an inch of fine bark mulch.
  • Dressing the final layer of soil with mulch or bark will help retain water.
  • I took the tree guards off to let the hens have a root around, then cleared the grass from around the tree, top dressed with bonemeal, added a good mulch of bark and replaced the guards.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
1Strip the bark from (a tree or piece of wood).
More example sentences
  • When the celebrations reached their height, initiates climbed nine-foot trees that were barked and notched to form ladders.
  • The others barked the logs, the sawing was done, and each one of the nine men received two wagon loads of good lumber for his share.
  • We felled trees for posts and beams using an old Royal Chinook two-person falling saw and then barked the logs with large drawknives.
1.1Scrape the skin off (one’s shin) by accidentally hitting it against something hard.
More example sentences
  • Desperate for a wee, he did two laps of the living room barking his shins and becoming increasingly panicky before finally locating the light switch and making good his escape.
  • But, when you tumble over and bark your shins, you are less than enamoured by gravity.
  • I barked my knees and shins several times on the way, but before long I found myself standing at the viewing area.
2 technical Tan or dye (leather or other materials) using the tannins found in bark.
More example sentences
  • He would use varnish and cottonseed oil and some ink black to bark the grain in the wood.

Origin

Middle English: from Old Norse bǫrkr; perhaps related to birch.

Derivatives

barked

adjective
[in combination]: the red-barked dogwood
More example sentences
  • Cut older black barked branches close to ground level to encourage fresh new growth next year.
  • Lodgepole pine has thin bark and is more easily killed at a given fire intensity than thicker barked associates.
  • In some places it is primeval and wet, where streaky barked eucalyptus strive upwards through dripping mists alive with frog croaks.

Definition of bark in:

There are 3 main definitions of bark in English:

bark3

Syllabification: bark
Pronunciation: /bärk
 
/
(also barque)

noun

1A sailing ship, typically with three masts, in which the foremast and mainmast are square-rigged and the mizzenmast is rigged fore-and-aft.
More example sentences
  • After centuries of sailing on wooden barks and later on sophisticated steam and gas turbine vessels, his passion for sail ships remains insatiable.
  • The bark is 42 metres long from her bowsprit to her stern, has a beam of almost ten metres and a draught of just under four metres.
  • With him came a fleet of 23 caravels, galleons and war barks.
1.1 archaic or literary A ship or boat.
More example sentences
  • Our NOVA team, which coalesced in Giza last night, was immersed in that story today as we examined and filmed the famous Solar Barque of Khufu.
  • If this journey included a trip on the Nile, the golden barque was put on a papyriform transport boat and taken to its destination.
  • On an indictment for manslaughter it appeared that the prisoner was a pilot, and was on board a Portuguese barque sailing down the Thames.

Origin

late Middle English: variant of barque.

Definition of bark in: