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bassoon Syllabification: bas·soon
Pronunciation: /bəˈso͞on/

Definition of bassoon in English:

noun

Image of bassoon
A bass instrument of the oboe family with a double reed.
Example sentences
  • Other unique curiosities are the 3 Sonatas that the composer wrote for each of the main woodwind instruments; oboe, bassoon and clarinet, although those for cor anglais and flute never saw the light of day.
  • Even more surprising are the number of standard orchestral instruments that are currently under threat - double bass, viola, horn, oboe, bassoon, tuba and trombone.
  • The performers here, being very good baroque musicians indeed, have deployed a variety of continuo combinations: harpsichord or lute with violone, gamba, double bass or bassoon.

Derivatives

bassoonist

1
Pronunciation: /bəˈso͞onəst/
noun
Example sentences
  • The doublereeder exists in just these two varieties - oboist and bassoonist.
  • Minor variations in bore profile can affect intonation, and all bassoonists have to experiment to some extent to find fingerings that suit their own instrument.
  • Had you been a bassoonist, I'd probably have suggested a violist!

Origin

Early 18th century: from French basson, from Italian bassone, from basso 'low', from Latin bassus 'short, low'.

Words that rhyme with bassoon

afternoon, attune, autoimmune, baboon, balloon, bestrewn, boon, Boone, bridoon, buffoon, Cameroon, Cancún, cardoon, cartoon, Changchun, cocoon, commune, croon, doubloon, dragoon, dune, festoon, galloon, goon, harpoon, hoon, immune, importune, impugn, Irgun, jejune, June, Kowloon, lagoon, lampoon, loon, macaroon, maroon, monsoon, moon, Muldoon, noon, oppugn, picayune, platoon, poltroon, pontoon, poon, prune, puccoon, raccoon, Rangoon, ratoon, rigadoon, rune, saloon, Saskatoon, Sassoon, Scone, soon, spittoon, spoon, swoon, Troon, tune, tycoon, typhoon, Walloon

Definition of bassoon in:

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