There are 2 definitions of bate in English:

bate1

Line breaks: bate

Entry from British & World English dictionary

(also bait)

noun

[in singular] British informal , dated
An angry mood: he got into a stinking bate

Origin

mid 19th century: from the verb bait 'torment', expressing the notion 'state of a baited person'.

Definition of bate in:

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Word of the day brannigan
Pronunciation: ˈbranɪg(ə)n
noun
a brawl or violent argument

There are 2 definitions of bate in English:

bate2

Syllabification: bate
Pronunciation: /bāt
 
/

verb

[no object] Falconry
(Of a hawk) beat the wings in an attempt to escape from the perch: the hawks bated when the breeze got in their feathers
More example sentences
  • This should obviate the possibility of the hawk getting “hung up” should the leash be over the top of the block when the hawk bates.
  • The leash ring is on the side of the main ring, producing a strong lateral pull when the hawk bates.
  • The ring, seen on the left hand end of the perch in the picture, should run freely from one end of the bow to the other, whichever way the hawk bates and it is almost potentially tangle proof.

Origin

late Middle English: from Old French batre 'to beat' (see also batter1).

Definition of bate in: