Definition of beaker in English:

beaker

Syllabification: beak·er
Pronunciation: /ˈbēkər
 
/

noun

1A lipped cylindrical glass container for laboratory use.
More example sentences
  • Inside the room-sized locker they built a virtual laboratory - complete with beakers, funnels, jars, glass tubes, transfer pumps and vats of chemicals.
  • On the north side of the room was Dipper's Magic shop, which was rather humble, comprising only a few shelves behind a counter upon which rested beakers and glass containers of what Doremi recognized were common spell components.
  • I'd anticipated him working inside a Back-To-The-Future kind of laboratory with bubbling beakers, coiled yellow electrical wire, and a suffocating sense of disarray.
1.1 archaic or literary A large drinking container with a wide mouth.
More example sentences
  • The imitations imply knowledge of imported origins and, in fact, the Divari tombs did contain Augustan-period beakers of Italian thin-walled ware.
  • The beaker in front of the first pitcher is a prize example of Anthony Rasch's New Orleans work, about 1825 to 1835.
  • Other discoveries include a wooden beaker, barbed arrowheads and armour.
1.2 Archaeology A waisted pot characteristic of graves of the Beaker folk.
More example sentences
  • Excavated in 1911, the primary burial dates to about 2500 BC and comprised a crouched inhumation in a cist accompanied by a beaker, bone pin, and flint tools.
  • From the near vicinity, there is a small beaker in Romano-British style from a grave at Little Wittenham, embellished with scenes depicting episodes in the life of Christ.
  • They included a pair of gold earrings, three copper knives, five beakers, two sets of flint tools, two stone archer's wristguards and a number of arrowheads.

Origin

Middle English (in the sense 'large drinking container'): from Old Norse bikarr, perhaps based on Greek bikos 'drinking bowl'.

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