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bellicose Syllabification: bel·li·cose
Pronunciation: /ˈbeləˌkōs/

Definition of bellicose in English:


Demonstrating aggression and willingness to fight: a group of bellicose patriots
More example sentences
  • Yet it is also a fact that the Administration has quietly backed down from a number of its most bellicose threats.
  • The fans also have their say and again the attitudes are conversational rather than bellicose and confrontational.
  • At the end of the 19th century, people were full of hope and expectations of a more peaceful, more contented, less bellicose world.


Pronunciation: /ˌbeləˈkäsədē/
Example sentences
  • So far, all the running for a ‘regime change’, as it is delicately known, has come from the president and his main security advisers, but for all their bellicosity they cannot declare war unilaterally.
  • It seems like we're all taken with wealth and bellicosity on some fundamental level.
  • And we in turn have resorted to bellicosity at a level that may or may not be justified.


Late Middle English: from Latin bellicosus, from bellicus 'warlike', from bellum 'war'.

  • rebel from Middle English:

    The Latin word rebellis was originally used in reference to someone making a fresh declaration of war after being defeated. The root was bellum ‘war’, as in bellicose (Late Middle English) or ‘warlike’, combined with re- ‘again’. A person who is deeply dissatisfied by society in general but does not have a specific aim to fight for might be described as a rebel without a cause. The first such person was James Dean, star of the 1955 film Rebel Without a Cause. Revel (Late Middle English) comes from the French equivalent, which developed the sense ‘to make a noise’ from the basic sense ‘to rise in rebellion’.

Definition of bellicose in:
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