Definition of blinders in English:

blinders

Syllabification: blind·ers
Pronunciation: /ˈblīndərz
 
/

noun

1North American A pair of small leather screens attached to a horse’s bridle to prevent it seeing sideways and behind. Also called blinkers (see blinker).
More example sentences
  • Spectators can be a problem for some horses, and I often find that some horses do better with blinders on (the kind that you see on racehorses).
  • Although the use of an a priori model greatly simplified the analysis of the 84 books, the model necessarily functions like a horse's blinders, constraining what is sought and therefore found.
  • Somehow, like putting blinders on a horse, he feels calmer.
1.1Something that prevents someone from gaining a full understanding of a situation: they will wear their cultural blinders to the grave
More example sentences
  • Like a horse at a race, we can have professional blinders on our eyes, limiting our explorations and our explanations to a particular ideological comfort zone.
  • He's got blinders on and I don't think he's serving the university well by continuing to beat this drum.
  • One suspects there isn't a problem in America, no matter how knotty or profound, that Gladwell can't imagine some nifty solution to, if only we'd take off the blinders of ideology and put on the glasses of science and observation.

Definition of blinders in:

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Word of the day guzzle
Pronunciation: ˈgʌz(ə)l
verb
eat or drink (something) greedily