There are 2 main definitions of boon in English:

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boon1

Syllabification: boon
Pronunciation: /bo͞on
 
/

noun

1 [usually in singular] A thing that is helpful or beneficial: the navigation system will be a boon to both civilian and military users
More example sentences
  • The evolution of sophisticated chargeback programs has been a boon to facility and real estate executives.
  • As a side benefit I am sure the bridge will also be a boon to fishermen and will be lined every night with salmon poachers slinging their hooks into the racing tide.
  • Yet, amazingly, instead of being hailed as a boon to public safety… it was criticized as a threat to privacy.
Synonyms
2 archaic A favor or request: may I have the inestimable boon of a few minutes' conversation?
More example sentences
  • One night, as Charumathi slept, Goddess Mahalakshmi appeared in her dreams and asked her to perform a puja to Varalakshmi, the goddess who granted boons.
  • The statue of the goddess in the sanctum was small and was heavily garlanded with bells and gold borders - offerings made to the goddess for boons granted.
  • He has long been deafened by amplified hymns in his temple, leaving no scope for boons and prayers.

Origin

Middle English (originally in the sense 'request for a favor'): from Old Norse bón.

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There are 2 main definitions of boon in English:

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boon2

Syllabification: boon
Pronunciation: /bo͞on
 
/

adjective

(Of a companion or friend) close; intimate; favorite: he debated the question with a few boon companions in the barroom
More example sentences
  • Thus equipped he again went abroad, and meeting with one Charles Tucker, a boon companion, laid in wait for the officers above named.
  • ‘I hope you’ll come,’ she says to Mr Cuddles, her boon companion.
  • There is the fact he is sinfully handsome, of a superior title, boon friend of the young Queen Victoria and rich.

Origin

mid 16th century: boon from Old French bon, from Latin bonus 'good'. The early literal sense was 'good fellow', originally denoting a drinking companion.

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