There are 4 main definitions of bore in English:

Share this entry

Share this page

bore1

Syllabification: bore
Pronunciation: /bôr
 
/

verb

1 [with object] Make (a hole) in something, especially with a revolving tool: they bored holes in the sides [no object]: the drill can bore through rock figurative his eyes bored into hers
More example sentences
  • He has a story for each tool he demonstrates, be it a drill that bores square holes or a spill plane.
  • Unfortunately, the head was attached to his body, which as a unit had rented the apartment under hers and had bored a hole in the ceiling for stalking purposes.
  • He was staring at a tree that the rock had bored a hole through.
Synonyms
drill, pierce, perforate, puncture, punch, cut;
tunnel, burrow, mine, dig, gouge, sink
1.1 [with object] Hollow out (a tube or tunnel): try to bore the tunnel at the correct angle
More example sentences
  • Some future civilization bores a tunnel vertically down, through the center of the earth, emerging at the opposite point on the globe.
  • Ever seen the front of those machines they use to bore subway tunnels?
  • The 12.9km Shueishan Tunnel, the centerpiece of the project, was bored through in September.
1.2Hollow out (a gun barrel).
Example sentences
  • The barrel is bored out and threaded at breech and muzzle to accept a 17-cal. barrel liner.
  • It should do well in traditionally bored barrels and less so in over-bored barrels.
  • Preparations were made to use a 50 million baht budget to bore pipes to drain off the water into the sea.
2 [no object] Make one’s way through (a crowd).
Example sentences
  • When he bores fastballs and sharp breaking pitches into the hands of righthanders, they have trouble getting around on them, even if they see them longer.
  • So will his cut fastball, which bores in on righthanded hitters and induces grounder after grounder to third base.
  • He expected another fastball, one more merciless sinker that would bore in on him.

noun

Back to top  
1The hollow part inside a gun barrel or other tube.
Example sentences
  • Barrels have ventilated ribs, hard-chromed bores, interchangeable choke tubes (three provided) and lengthened forcing cones to reduce recoil.
  • The inside bore might be 12 in, but the barrels are well over a metre in diameter at the base.
  • The bore of the Browning barrel was mirror smooth from one end to the other.
1.1 [often in combination] The diameter of this; the caliber: a small-bore rifle
More example sentences
  • It is also available as a shotgun in 12 and 20 gauge, and .410 bore.
  • The traditional .22 rifle has been replaced by a choice of Browning automatic handgun or sawn-off 12 bore shotgun.
  • In its shotgun line, it has added a 28 gauge and .410 bore to its series.
1.2 [in combination] A gun of a specified bore: he shot a guard in the leg with a twelve-bore
2 short for borehole.
Example sentences
  • Lighting control panels are being installed in the portal equipment rooms, in niches along the length of the tunnel, and in the passageways connecting the bores.
  • The firm wanted to eliminate building mandatory escape cross tunnels between bores, a job requiring tricky ground freezing, says Harnois.
  • Despite all the difficulties the two ends of the tunnel bore met as planned in 1916.

Origin

Old English borian (verb), of Germanic origin; related to German bohren.

Share this entry

Share this page

 

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

There are 4 main definitions of bore in English:

Share this entry

Share this page

bore2

Syllabification: bore
Pronunciation: /bôr
 
/

noun

1A person whose talk or behavior is dull and uninteresting: a crashing bore who tells the same old jokes over and over
More example sentences
  • I think he has simply demonstrated once again why he has become such a crashing bore.
  • At a deeper level, it seems to me that he is a world-class crashing bore.
  • The days of desperately trying to escape the clutches of some crashing bore in the corner of a nightclub are long gone.
1.1 [in singular] A tedious situation or thing: it’s such a bore cooking when one’s alone
More example sentences
  • Instead, it's a tedious and meretricious bore, and those are the worst kind.
  • The course can sometimes be a bore but I find the major subjects quite interesting.
  • Will's columns can sometimes be a bore, ripping a social healthcare program here and our educational system's shortcomings there.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
Make (someone) feel weary and uninterested by tedious talk or dullness: rather than bore you with all the details, I’ll hit some of the bright spots
More example sentences
  • Oh please, Damion, your insults are so dull it bores me.
  • It's a pretty good story, actually, though I get bored by cards very quickly.
  • I'll give it a go next week, but imagine that this will quickly bore me.
Synonyms
stultify, pall on, stupefy, weary, tire, fatigue, send to sleep, leave cold;
bore to death, bore to tears
informal turn off

Origin

mid 18th century (as a verb): of unknown origin.

Phrases

bore someone to death (or to tears)

1
Weary (a person) in the extreme.
Example sentences
  • It's about getting you from here to there without scaring you to death, boring you to tears, or intimidating your socks off.
  • If all of you have not been bored to death and fallen asleep on the keyboard by now, I really do admire your resilience.
  • ‘If we were bored to death, honestly I don't think we would do it,’ he said.

Share this entry

Share this page

 

There are 4 main definitions of bore in English:

Share this entry

Share this page

bore3

Syllabification: bore
Pronunciation: /bôr
 
/

noun

A steep-fronted wave caused by the meeting of two tides or by the constriction of a tide rushing up a narrow estuary.
Example sentences
  • The largest bores occur on 25 days a year, in the morning and evening, with biggest bores on tides over 32’.
  • Experiments in a laboratory wave tank show that interactions between bores refracted by a prowlike beach can produce jets in which the velocity is nearly twice the bore's phase speed.
  • On the Shubenacadie River, the tidal bore and rapidly rising tide results in extremely turbulent waters.

Origin

early 17th century: perhaps from Old Norse bára 'wave'; the term was used in the general sense 'billow, wave' in Middle English.

Share this entry

Share this page

 

There are 4 main definitions of bore in English:

Share this entry

Share this page

bore4

Syllabification: bore
Pronunciation: /bôr
 
/
Past of bear1.

Share this entry

Share this page

 

What do you find interesting about this word or phrase?

Comments that don't adhere to our Community Guidelines may be moderated or removed.