There are 4 definitions of BOSS in English:

BOSS1

Line breaks: BOSS

Entry from British & World English dictionary

abbreviation

Bureau of State Security.

Definition of BOSS in:

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Word of the day dinkum
Pronunciation: ˈdɪŋkəm
adjective
(of an article or person) genuine, honest, true

There are 4 definitions of BOSS in English:

boss2

Syllabification: boss
Pronunciation: /bôs
 
, bäs
 
/
informal

noun

1A person in charge of a worker or organization: I asked my boss for a promotion union bosses
More example sentences
  • Four in 10 office workers say they think bosses regularly charge personal items back to the company.
  • Union bosses believe railway maintenance workers are still risking their lives because lessons from the Tebay rail tragedy remain unlearned.
  • Blum's first act was to stop the strike wave by organising talks between the bosses and the unions.
1.1A person in control of a group or situation: the boss of the largest crime family in the country
More example sentences
  • Traditionally, men are supposed to be in control and be the boss at work.
  • The ENTIRE point of blogs is being the boss and controlling content.
  • It does take a while to get used to, but remember, to teach your dog anything, you must be the leader and the boss.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
Give (someone) orders in a domineering manner: plump old battle-axes bossing everyone around
More example sentences
  • At least they weren't always bossing her around and ordering her around like a slave like Kinchi, but instead treated her like she had always wanted to be treated.
  • It seems to me that this Government is reaching new heights in ordering and bossing people about and telling them what it expects them to do.
  • They'll say, ‘Will you stop bossing me around?’
Synonyms
order around, dictate to, lord it over, bully, push around, domineer, dominate, pressurize, browbeat; call the shots for, lay down the law on, bulldoze, walk all over, railroad

adjective

[attributive] North American Back to top  
Excellent; outstanding: she’s a real boss chick
More example sentences
  • I like that second picture the best; it's a boss shot!

Origin

early 19th century (originally US): from Dutch baas 'master'.

Phrases

be one's own boss

Be self-employed.
More example sentences
  • ‘I was my own boss, I had a company van and my mates would drop in and we could listen to the rock music all day long,’ says Baldock.
  • I was my own boss by 21, trading professionally in the retail game.
  • Wonder Woman, on the other hand, was her own boss.

show someone who's boss

Make it clear that one is in charge.
More example sentences
  • Wednesday Tony Blair is shown who's boss by the ladies of the Women's Institute at their annual conference in London.
  • Now George is looking forward to showing Floyd who's boss when they walk out at Bothwell Castle today - just as he did in Barbados ten years ago.
  • We're going to show you who's boss.

Definition of BOSS in:

There are 4 definitions of BOSS in English:

boss3

Syllabification: boss
Pronunciation: /bôs
 
/

noun

1A round knob, stud, or other protuberance, in particular.
More example sentences
  • First you need a blank boss, indoors preferably (garage, hallway or sports hall) at 12 inches from the end of your long rod.
  • The dish is signed ‘FB’ on the central boss for Francois Briot, the most celebrated member of a French family of medallists and die-cutters.
  • The genus Eoporpita shows extensive tentacles radiating from a central boss, which in some specimens appears chambered.
1.1A stud on the center of a shield.
More example sentences
  • As we walked by I saw Yrling's and Toki's war-kits, for they were easy to discern by the fineness of the helmets and the gilt upon the bosses of their shields.
  • A number of other male graves contained shield bosses and spear heads, although all traces of the wooden shields and spears had long disappeared.
  • Thorfast would at least have had a heavy wooden shield with a metal boss that he'd have held on his left arm. and an eight-foot-long, metal-tipped ash spear.
1.2 Architecture A piece of ornamental carving covering the point where the ribs in a vault or ceiling cross.
More example sentences
  • In the medieval Hall of St Mary, Green Men occur as bosses, corbels, in tapestry, and in stained glass.
  • The western bay of the vault, built in 1362, carries a hanging boss suspended by eight dramatic flying ribs.
  • Four floral bosses help secure the flying ribs, while an intricate carved star hangs from the center and anchors the inner square.
1.3 Geology A large mass of igneous rock protruding through other strata.
More example sentences
  • They are commonly exposed as small stocks, bosses, sheets and dykes and are often intimately related to the granitoids outlined above.
  • The first drops down a fissure in the floor, which leads down to a stalagmite boss partway along the hand traverse.
  • Shortly after a chamber with a small shaft off to the left, you need to slide past an impressive stalagmitic boss.
1.4 Mechanics An enlarged part of a shaft.
More example sentences
  • The sights are conventional, with a front blade mounted atop a boss on the barrel.

Origin

Middle English: from Old French boce, of unknown origin.

Definition of BOSS in:

There are 4 definitions of BOSS in English:

boss4

Syllabification: boss
Pronunciation: /bôs
 
/

noun

US informal
A cow. Compare with bossy2.

Origin

early 19th century: of unknown origin.

Definition of BOSS in: