Definition of campaign in English:

campaign

Syllabification: cam·paign
Pronunciation: /kamˈpān
 
/

noun

1A series of military operations intended to achieve a particular objective, confined to a particular area, or involving a specified type of fighting: a desert campaign the air campaign the army set off on campaign
More example sentences
  • This he achieved by a prolonged series of military campaigns which unified all northern India under his rule.
  • For the media it is a conflict conducted in a series of military campaigns.
  • The Crusades were a series of military campaigns during the time of Medieval England against the Muslims of the Middle East.
Synonyms
military operation(s), maneuver(s); crusade, war, battle, offensive, attack
1.1An organized course of action to achieve a particular goal: an advertising campaign an election campaign the campaign for a full inquiry into the regime [with infinitive]: his campaign to win the heart of a new woman
More example sentences
  • Passenger numbers have soared since the M.E.N. won a campaign for a new city centre coach station.
  • From this platform he launched his campaign for election to the Lower House in 1958.
  • The campaign against nanotechnology, like other green campaigns, is being built on the twin themes of unknown risk and corporate greed.
Synonyms
crusade, drive, push, struggle; operation, strategy, battle plan

verb

[no object] Back to top  
Work in an organized and active way toward a particular goal, typically a political or social one: people who campaigned against child labor [with infinitive]: the services he had campaigned to protect
More example sentences
  • What does this say about his attitude towards the parliament he campaigned to establish?
  • He added that low pay advocacy groups were also campaigning against the changes.
  • Villagers in Heaton are among those now campaigning to protect land from housing.
Synonyms
crusade, fight, battle, push, press, strive, struggle, lobby

Origin

early 17th century (denoting a tract of open country): from French campagne 'open country', via Italian from late Latin campania, from campus 'level ground' (see camp1). The change in sense arose from an army's practice of “taking the field” (i.e., moving from a fortress or town to open country) at the onset of summer.

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