Definition of caption in English:

caption

Syllabification: cap·tion
Pronunciation: /ˈkapSHən
 
/

noun

  • 1A title or brief explanation appended to an article, illustration, cartoon, or poster.
    More example sentences
    • Bournemouth Council now uses cartoon captions on its posters to attract attention.
    • The captions accompanying posters (which showed streams of bright sunlight through the clouds) were written in mock bible-speak.
    • Every key work is illustrated and accompanied by an explanatory caption.
    Synonyms
    title, heading, wording, head, legend, subtitle; rubric, slogan; supertitle
    trademark surtitle
  • 1.1A piece of text appearing on a movie or television screen as part of a movie or broadcast.
    More example sentences
    • The film, punctuated by captions highlighting what the party considers key achievements, wasn't so much about setting out key pledges but setting a tone and feeling for Labour's protagonists.
    • To judge by the Estonian television captions, the first day of the Leaving Cert was marked by the coming together of two trade unions, EESTI and IIRIMAA.
    • And on the simplest level, there was a disconcerting clash between the postmodern textuality dispensed by the singers and the humble captions on the screen.
  • 1.2 Law The heading of a legal document.
    More example sentences
    • Deeds, captions on cases, and other legal forms like subpoenas all serve the purpose of giving notice, which is how lawyers and the courts communicate with the public.
    • The case is notable not for the momentousness of the underlying legal question but for its amusing caption.
    • Defendants' motion to remove Kama's name from the caption of this case is ALLOWED.

verb

[with object] (usually be captioned) Back to top  
  • Provide (an illustration) with a title or explanation: the drawings were captioned with humorous texts [with two objects]: the photograph was captioned “Three little maids.”
    More example sentences
    • The photographs are carefully captioned, providing simple but interesting details about the plants and creatures.
    • But the New York Times admired Magnussen's design when it was introduced and captioned its illustration of it ‘The Lights and Shadows of New York.’
    • Informative text provides a running commentary, and each photo is captioned with historical details.

Origin

late Middle English (in the sense 'seizing, capture'): from Latin caption-, from capere 'take, seize'. Early senses 'arrest' and 'warrant for arrest' gave rise to 'statement of where, when, and by whose authority a warrant was issued' (late 17th century): this was usually appended to a legal document, hence the sense 'heading or appended wording' (late 18th century).

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