Definition of carinate in English:

carinate

Syllabification: car·i·nate
Pronunciation: /ˈkarəˌnāt, -nit
 
/

adjective

  • 1Having a keellike ridge.
    More example sentences
    • The bluffs above the swamp are the only known home of the carinate pill snail, a species once thought extinct.
  • 1.1(Of a bird) having a deep ridge on the breastbone for the attachment of flight muscles. Contrasted with ratite.
    More example sentences
    • Fossils of volant paleoganthous carinate birds from the Paleocene and Eocene appear phenetically most similar to tinamiform birds.
    • Penguins are flightless divers with poorly pneumatized skeleton, carinate sternum with two lateral notches, 15 cervical vertebrae and basipterygoid processes absent.
    • The story of Mesozoic birds became complicated by the discovery in 1985, by Russian colleague Evgeny Kurochkin, of Ambiortus, a Lower Cretaceous archaic but modern-type ornithurine (carinate) bird with an advanced flight apparatus.

Derivatives

carinated

Pronunciation: /-ˌnātid/
adjective
More example sentences
  • Other elements of the Mycenaean drinking set were found in small quantities in the subsidiary rooms, but these were greatly outnumbered by the indigenous forms, in particular the Base Ring carinated cup.
  • From the same tomb comes a composite Helladic-Minoan silver goblet, with its carinated shape and a Minoan niello floral scene.
  • Among these latter Caddo groups, simple bowls and carinated bowls comprise between 57 and 70 percent of the vessels placed in the graves as burial offerings.

carination

Pronunciation: /ˌkarəˈnāSHən/
noun
More example sentences
  • Furthermore, recently sectioned topotypes of Orthocyathus flexus include forms with stronger carination than is normally found in Cyathophyllum dianthus.
  • Other genera and species of the Goniasmatidae have a heliciform larval shell without carination while the larval shell of the Erwinispirinae is markedly bicarinate.
  • In most cases, the carinated bowl has a wider diameter (at either the carination or the orifice) than the height of the vessel.

Origin

late 18th century: from Latin carinatus 'having a keel', from carina 'keel'.

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