Definition of catechize in English:

catechize

Syllabification: cat·e·chize
Pronunciation: /ˈkadəˌkīz
 
/

verb

[with object]
1Instruct (someone) in the principles of Christian religion by means of question and answer, typically by using a catechism.
More example sentences
  • The natural sorting process tells us something about how we need to catechize teenagers.
  • To save Shaw from hell-fire, a friend prevailed on a Roman Catholic priest to catechize the upstart Atheist.
  • I work in the beautiful new Cathedral, evangelizing and catechizing the children of two recently merged parish communities (one English, one Spanish).
1.1Put questions to or interrogate (someone).
More example sentences
  • From our earliest years, we are catechized into a civic faith: Competition brings out the best in us.
  • Appalled by his indolence, gaming, and iconoclastic opinions, his psychology professor tried to catechize him: ‘Tut, tut, what does Saint Paul say, Mr. Crane?’
  • None may chastise him for deviance (for there is none), nor catechize him about the path to take (for there are as many paths as there are seekers).

Origin

late Middle English: via late Latin from ecclesiastical Greek katēkhizein, from katēkhein 'instruct orally, make hear'.

Derivatives

catechizer

noun
More example sentences
  • Thanks to the hard work of the missionaries and catechizers this situation is slowly changing.
  • Thomas Wilkinson came with me to Barton and questioned me like a catechiser all the way.
  • After his return to Cyprus, he worked as a preacher and catechizer in the Archdiocese.

Definition of catechize in:

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adjective
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