Share this entry

Share this page

chapbook

Syllabification: chap·book
Pronunciation: /ˈCHapˌbo͝ok
 
/

Definition of chapbook in English:

noun

historical
1A small pamphlet containing tales, ballads, or tracts, sold by peddlers.
Example sentences
  • The print revolution undoubtedly had an important impact on folk culture, through, for example, the mass printing of chapbooks, ballads, almanacs, and cheap abbreviated novels, not to mention religious literature.
  • The wealth of John Winchcombe, ‘Jack of Newbury’, in the early Tudor period was legendary and his exploits were commemorated in ballads and chapbooks.
  • Moreover, the practice, in England at least, of the printing of chapbooks and ballads meant that reading for leisure was also a possibility.
1.1North American A small paperback booklet, typically containing poems or fiction.
Example sentences
  • That year she published the first of three chapbooks, Ten Poems.
  • She holds an MFA in writing and literature from Bennington, and is author of two chapbooks of poems, most recently What Stays.
  • A chapbook of his poems is forthcoming from Groundwater Press.

Origin

early 19th century: from chapman + book.

Definition of chapbook in:

Share this entry

Share this page

 

What do you find interesting about this word or phrase?

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day ingratiate
Pronunciation: ɪnˈɡreɪʃɪeɪt
verb
bring oneself into favour with someone through flattery…