Definition of chattel in English:

chattel

Syllabification: chat·tel
Pronunciation: /ˈCHadl
 
/

noun

1(In general use) a personal possession.
More example sentences
  • There is no talk of compulsory acquisition or compensation: they are being forced to leave their homeland with nothing - no chattels, heirlooms or personal possessions.
  • She said money-lenders seemed to target people who owned chattels, so these could be listed as security items.
  • Women are regarded paradoxically as personal chattel as well as a source of honour and pride.
1.1 Law An item of property other than real estate. See also goods and chattels.
More example sentences
  • The mortgage, both over chattels and over real property, as well as a fixed and a floating charge granted by a corporation, fall into this group.
  • An additional way in which the matter may have to be tested is against the case where the trust property is a chattel.
  • George, like many land reformers, considered that land, unlike chattels, had been common property in early society; that existing land titles were effectively rooted in ancient theft.

Origin

Middle English: from Old French chatel, from medieval Latin capitale, from Latin capitalis, from caput 'head'. Compare with capital1 and cattle.

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excessive pride or self-confidence