Definition of cheer in English:

cheer

Syllabification: cheer
Pronunciation: /CHi(ə)r
 
/

verb

  • 1 [no object] Shout for joy or in praise or encouragement: she cheered from the sidelines
    More example sentences
    • As I came across the field I heard the crowd shouting and cheering as I got closer.
    • She could hear the crowd cheering loudly, shouting things she could not seem to grasp.
    • He shouted something in his language and the crowds cheered once more.
    Synonyms
    encourage, urge on, spur on, drive on, motivate, inspire, fire (up), inspirit, light a fire under
  • 1.1 [with object] Praise or encourage with shouts: they cheered his emotional speech the cyclists were cheered on by the crowds
    More example sentences
    • This is the only home game left in the league as the remaining three games are away and a large support to cheer the lads on would be appreciated.
    • As we walked into the TA our support crew cheered us on and we plopped into the chairs set out for us.
    • This was a close and exciting game with a huge number of supporters cheering their sides on.
    Synonyms
    applaud, hail, salute, shout for, root for, hurrah, hurray, acclaim, clap for; encourage, support; bring the house down for, holler for, give someone a big hand, put one's hands together for
  • 2 [with object] Give comfort or support to: he seemed greatly cheered by my arrival
    More example sentences
    • There is more cheering news for Cameron supporters, though.
    • It contains light to direct you, food to support you, and comfort to cheer you.
    • Enlist the help of a life coach, friend, or family member to cheer you on in support.
    Synonyms
    raise someone's spirits, make happier, brighten, buoy up, enliven, exhilarate, hearten, gladden, uplift, perk up, boost, encourage, inspirit
    informal buck up
  • 2.1 (cheer someone up or cheer up) Make or become less miserable: [with object]: I asked her out to lunch to cheer her up [no object]: he cheered up at the sight of the food
    More example sentences
    • He said he was thankful to his teachers, who had encouraged him and cheered him up when he was unhappy.
    • I did my best to cheer them up and encourage them.
    • They had taken care of her when she was sick, or hurt, and they had comforted and cheered her up when she was sad.
    Synonyms
    perk up, brighten (up), become more cheerful, liven up, rally, revive, bounce back, take heart
    informal buck up

noun

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  • 1A shout of encouragement, praise, or joy: a tremendous cheer from the audience
    More example sentences
    • Then the room exploded into cheers and claps and catcalls.
    • Elizabeth's gay laugh mingled with the cheers and hollers of everyone out in the yard.
    • The watchers began to make wagers and to shout encouragements and cheers.
    Synonyms
    hurray, hurrah, whoop, bravo, shout, roar; hosanna, alleluia; (cheers) applause, acclamation, clamor, acclaim, ovation
  • 1.1A brief phrase shouted in unison by a crowd, typically led by cheerleaders, in support of an athletic team.
    More example sentences
    • BG will lead the cheer for you any day (cheerleaders are athletes, you know).
    • Ignoring the crowd's cheer, I jumped off the platform onto the arena.
    • The crowd let out another cheer, and the crowd had certainly grown.

Phrases

of good cheer

archaic Cheerful; optimistic.
More example sentences
  • It was to be a rosy day, full of good cheer and bright optimism.
  • With the kids jingle belling and everyone telling you be of good cheer, it's the most wonderful time of the year.
  • For many folks, the holidays are a time to join family and loved ones in a blizzard of good cheer and heartwarming togetherness.

three cheers

Three successive hurrahs shouted to express appreciation or congratulation: three cheers for the winners!
More example sentences
  • It was a congratulations to him and a three cheers.
  • He and the other two waved the rest off and said three cheers to them.
  • The Commerce students of Fatima College topped the competitive list with high scores, receiving three cheers from the spectators.

what cheer?

archaic How are you?.

Origin

Middle English: from Old French chiere 'face', from late Latin cara, from Greek kara 'head'. The original sense was 'face', hence 'expression, mood', later specifically 'a good mood'.

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