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cocoon

Syllabification: co·coon
Pronunciation: /kəˈko͞on
 
/

Definition of cocoon in English:

noun

1A silky case spun by the larvae of many insects for protection in the pupal stage.
Example sentences
  • In Nest 1, the oldest cells held mature larvae ready to spin cocoons and medium-sized larvae.
  • Moths such as the luna and polyphemus spend the winter months as pupae in leaf-wrapped cocoons.
  • I saw a spider's web and an insect larva beginning to spin a cocoon.
1.1A covering that prevents the corrosion of metal equipment.
1.2Something that envelops or surrounds, especially in a protective or comforting way: the cocoon of her kimono figurative a warm cocoon of love
More example sentences
  • I wanted my children to have security and a cocoon of love.
  • She woke to a blissfully comfortable state, smothered in a cocoon of feathery soft blankets.
  • He snapped it shut, closing me in a cocoon of darkness.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
1Envelop or surround in a protective or comforting way: we began to feel cold even though we were cocooned in our sleeping bags
More example sentences
  • ‘It is difficult starting up any new business, particularly if you have been cocooned in a comfortable corporate lifestyle,’ he said.
  • We keep a look out for friends' boats and chat to lock-keepers but for most of the time we're cocooned in our comfortable, private world.
  • She allowed herself to be cocooned in the warm swaddling cloth of his borrowed shirt, feeling, for once, safe and warm and almost invincible.
Synonyms
1.2 [no object] North American Retreat from the stressful conditions of public life into the cozy private world of the family: the movers and shakers are now cocooning
More example sentences
  • The parties went on and when not socializing he cocooned more and more with his family.
  • Instead of leading the country to an exciting new reality, they cocoon in a scary, paranoid, regressive reality.
  • Trendwatchers say people are cocooning and spending more time at home, perhaps because of current events.

Origin

late 17th century: from French cocon, from medieval Provençal coucoun 'eggshell, cocoon', diminutive of coca 'shell'. The verb dates from the mid 19th century.

Derivatives

cocooner

1
noun
Example sentences
  • We send it to interested cocooners who wish to be informed about new products available on the web.
  • We have became cocooners and have put a lot of emphasis on our homes in the past few years.
  • With the latest death count from the earthquake/tsunami passing 52,000, even a normally ethnocentric cocooner like me can't help but be moved to action.

Definition of cocoon in:

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Pronunciation: ˈtɛnɪbrəs
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