Definition of collaboration in English:

collaboration

Syllabification: col·lab·o·ra·tion
Pronunciation: /kəˌlabəˈrāSHən
 
/

noun

  • 1The action of working with someone to produce or create something: he wrote on art and architecture in collaboration with John Betjeman
    More example sentences
    • At the same time, the Mongolian Polo Association was formed in collaboration with the government.
    • It enables students to use e-mail to conduct research, share information and work in collaboration with others.
    • During the course of the year, the volunteers will be working in collaboration with the park to educate the public on cleaner habits.
  • 1.1Something produced or created by collaboration: his recent opera was a collaboration with Lessing
    More example sentences
    • He is also looking forward to the release of his first record, a collaboration with The Divine Comedy.
    • The album has some amazing Santana Band songs and some tight collaborations with guest artists that you will surely hear on your favorite radio stations this summer.
    • Part of the urban myth surrounding her is that the songs she says she wrote were collaborations, and the songs she says were collaborations were nothing to do with her.
  • 2Traitorous cooperation with an enemy: he faces charges of collaboration
    More example sentences
    • Trials for war crimes, collaboration, and genocide continued in several countries for many years after the war.
    • Any cooperation with Israel would be seen by many Palestinians as collaboration with the enemy.
    • In English, ‘quisling’ has since come to denote collaboration with the enemy.

Derivatives

collaborationist

noun & adjective
sense 2.
More example sentences
  • Progressives who play that game should be exposed for what they are, namely class collaborationists and allies of bloodspilling empire-extending capitalists.
  • The Sorrow and the Pity is about the Nazi occupation of France, particularly in one city, Clermont-Ferrand, in the part of France governed by the collaborationist Vichy Regime.
  • The ‘femmes tondues’, collaborationist women whose heads were shaved, remain among the most striking images of the time.

Origin

mid 19th century: from Latin collaboratio(n-), from collaborare 'work together'.

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Word of the day coloratura
Pronunciation: ˌkɒlərəˈtjʊərə
noun
elaborate ornamentation of a vocal melody