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colophon

Syllabification: col·o·phon
Pronunciation: /ˈkäləfən, -ˌfän
 
/

Definition of colophon in English:

noun

1A publisher’s emblem or imprint, especially one on the title page or spine of a book.
Example sentences
  • Old colophons on school books sport two sorts of logo: oblong whorls, rococo scrolls - both in worn morocco.
  • In his long commentary on that adage, Erasmus described the genesis and significance of the anchor and dolphin in the Aldine colophon.
  • Caxton learned to print in Bruges, using Burgundian styles, texts, and machines, so the earliest English books have a Burgundian feel, most evident in typefaces, layouts, and colophons.
1.1 historical A statement at the end of a book, typically with a printer’s emblem, giving information about its authorship and printing.
Example sentences
  • Caxton's prefaces, colophons, and epilogues in particular are self-conscious about authorship, purpose, genre, sources, patronage, medium, and technique.
  • Many books have colophons at the end giving the name of one or more scribes, and sometimes giving the names of patrons.
  • He is named in the colophon as one of the publishers and Isaac is named on the title page as the printer.

Origin

early 17th century (denoting a finishing touch): via late Latin from Greek kolophōn 'summit or finishing touch'.

Definition of colophon in:

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