Definition of commotion in English:

commotion

Syllabification: com·mo·tion
Pronunciation: /kəˈmōSH(ə)n
 
/

noun

1A state of confused and noisy disturbance: she was distracted by a commotion across the street figure out what all the commotion is about
More example sentences
  • I heard some noise and his excited voice and a whole lot of other commotions.
  • His arms around his head, he shut his eyes, blocking out all the commotions that came from outside his room and making his mind completely blank, devoid of any obvious emotions.
  • Alerted by the commotion the burglar was disturbed and chased by pub regulars but he got away.
Synonyms
1.1Civil insurrection: damage caused by civil commotion
More example sentences
  • The winter that was to provide respite from the summer's commotion only proved to be worse.
  • Aaron held him down though, preventing any commotion that would endanger our lives as well as the captains.
  • The climax of these commotions came during the fourth week of September, when the parliament returned in triumph from its exile.

Origin

late Middle English: from Latin commotio(n-), from com- 'altogether' + motio (see motion).

Definition of commotion in:

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