Definition of confessor in English:

confessor

Syllabification: con·fes·sor
Pronunciation: /kənˈfesər
 
 
/

noun

  • 1 /kōnˈfesər, ˈkänˌfesər, ˈkänfəˌsôr/ A priest who hears confessions and gives absolution and spiritual counsel.
    More example sentences
    • This is indeed the duty of the priest's confessor or spiritual director, the representative of the tribunal of mercy.
    • As early as 1532, in a famous memorial meant for Clement VII, he called for the repression of the friars, priests, preachers, confessors, and books he saw as responsible for the spread of heretical ideas among the Italian populace.
    • Since not every priest is a good confessor, one of the book's most interesting chapters deals with finding the right guide.
  • 1.1A person to whom another confides personal problems.
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    • It was still Sam, his confidant, his confessor, his penitent, his port in the storm and most beloved brother.
    • Standing on the platform now, he watched them go - his own dear Indians who had become his silent family and friends, even his confessors.
    • John was her sometime confessor and perhaps the only person, male or female, before whom Teresa stood in awe.
  • 2 /kənˈfesər, ˈkänˌfesər/ A person who avows religious faith in the face of opposition, but does not suffer martyrdom.
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    • However, not only the martyrs but also the confessors bore their tribulations and infirmities with great patience, and have to this day.
    • And with each persecution came newly baptized confessors.
    • The bishop and his men went once, twice, thrice around it, chanting all the while the litany of Christ, of Mary Ever-Virgin, the angels, apostles, glorious martyrs, confessors, and virgins sacred to God.
  • 3 /kənˈfesər/ A person who makes a confession.
    More example sentences
    • He has to wait in the church for the other confessors to finish, which leaves him plenty of time to keep meditating on the wretchedness of his sins.
    • Judges rarely render even highly suspicious confessions inadmissible, and juries often convict confessors, even in the absence of physical evidence.
    • If yes, the test held, prosecutors could use it against the confessor; if not - if interrogators had coerced the confession - prosecutors couldn't use it.

Origin

Old English (sense 2): from Old French confessour, from ecclesiastical Latin confessor, from Latin confess- 'acknowledged' (see confess).

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