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convoke

Syllabification: con·voke
Pronunciation: /kənˈvōk
 
/

Definition of convoke in English:

verb

[with object] formal
Call together or summon (an assembly or meeting): she sent messages convoking a Council of Ministers
More example sentences
  • Several villages contested the payment by taking their case to the parlement, and other villages followed suit by convoking general assemblies, naming syndics to represent their interests, and refusing to pay the full amount.
  • On June 15 the organization convoked a meeting to which it invited ‘all those who feel concerned about the future of communism.’
  • This is what happened when the government gave in to the armed forces' demand to convoke a special meeting of the National Security Council.
Synonyms

Origin

late 16th century: from Latin convocare, from con- 'together' + vocare 'call'.

More
  • voice from (Middle English):

    A word derived from Latin vox ‘voice’ and is related to vocabulary (mid 16th century), vocal (Middle English), vocation (Late Middle English), and vociferous (early 17th century), while the verb vocare ‘to call’ appears in convoke (late 16th century) ‘call together’; equivocate (Late Middle English) literally ‘call by the same name’; evoke (early 17th century) ‘call out’; invoke (Late Middle English) ‘call upon’; provoke (Late Middle English) ‘call forth’; revoke (Late Middle English) ‘call back’; and vouch (Middle English) and voucher (early 16th century). Vowel (Middle English) is from Old French vouel, from Latin vocalis (littera) ‘vocal (letter)’. The Latin root survives in vox pop, ‘an informal survey of people's opinion’, which is short for Latin vox populi or ‘voice of the people’. When people refer to an ignored advocate of reform as a voice in the wilderness they are echoing the words of John the Baptist proclaiming the coming of the Messiah: ‘I am the voice of one crying in the wilderness.’

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