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courier

Syllabification: cour·i·er
Pronunciation: /ˈko͝orēər
 
, ˈkərēər
 
/

Definition of courier in English:

noun

1A messenger who transports goods or documents, in particular.
1.1A company or employee of a company that transports commercial packages and documents: the check was dispatched by courier [as modifier]: a courier service
More example sentences
  • A colleague came over to the group of desks where I sit bearing a package in a courier company's bag.
  • Detectives believe he was on his way to a courier service company to ship several headphones to England.
  • In other news, the stupid courier company delivered my travel documents and flight tickets at 6.20 am this morning.
1.2A messenger for an underground or espionage organization.
Example sentences
  • Most of what he acquired was microfilm brought out of Poland to the West by underground couriers.
  • They forged documents, collected arms, and were couriers to the Warsaw underground.
  • Each day a courier from Washington would bring to the New York office the latest current intelligence products for use by the President-elect and his staff.
2A person employed to guide and assist a group of tourists.
Example sentences
  • The fun began in the South of France when I was a tour courier.
  • Though whites were concerned about her masculine appearance, she worked as a guide, courier, warrior and peacemaker for the next 25 years.
  • Every coach will have a courier and it will be the best-managed coach operation ever.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
Send or transport (goods or documents) by courier.
Example sentences
  • I've sent her a large bouquet of flowers and couriered her some photos of her great-grandchildren both of which she was very happy to receive.
  • They give students the option of appearing for model test papers either in the classroom (the tests will be held in these centres on Sunday), or couriering their answers to the centre.
  • All the luggage that we know of has been couriered back to each of the passengers or they have come in and picked it up.

Origin

late Middle English (denoting a person sent to run with a message): originally from Old French coreor; later from French courier (now courrier), from Italian corriere; based on Latin currere 'to run'.

Definition of courier in:

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