There are 3 definitions of crank in English:

crank1

Syllabification: crank
Pronunciation: /kraNGk
 
/

verb

[with object]
1Turn the crankshaft of (an internal combustion engine), typically in order to start the engine.
More example sentences
  • Imagine your commanders surprise when you crank up the engine and hover over the Garage!
  • Otherwise, we would still be running steam engines and have to crank up our car to start it every morning.
  • ‘Later,’ he replied as he watched her climb into her small black 2000 Volkswagen Beetle and cranked the engine.
Synonyms
start, turn (over), get going
1.1Turn (a handle), typically in order to start an engine.
More example sentences
  • I longingly imagined the downstairs bathroom: an old woman cranking the handle of the paper towel dispenser.
  • He would crank the handle at varying rates of speed.
  • You can recharge the Coleman Sentinel in any household outlet, or when the power is out, just crank the handle.
1.2 (crank something up) informal Increase the intensity of something: he cranked up the foghorn to full volume
More example sentences
  • ‘Certainly, the upcoming address has cranked things up a notch,’ says a mainland military analyst.
  • It got burnt cos I was impatient and cranked the heat up a notch.
  • I found the CD of choice and popped it in, cranking the volume up as was my habit when I was upset.
Synonyms
increase, intensify, amplify, heighten, escalate, add to, augment, build up, expand, extend, raise; speed up, accelerate; up, jack up, hike up, step up, bump up, pump up
1.3 (crank something out) informal Produce something regularly and routinely: an army of researchers cranked out worthy studies
More example sentences
  • The new album was cranked out in only a few short weeks.
  • Compared to the rest of the world, U.S. workers are cranking it out, pressed to do more and more.
  • Last week I finally decided to sit down and crank it out, and it was maybe 3-4 days of work total.
2 (usually as adjective cranked) Give a bend to (a shaft, bar, etc.).

noun

Back to top  
1A part of an axle or shaft bent out at right angles, for converting reciprocal to circular motion and vice versa.
More example sentences
  • The connecting rods connected directly to a crank on the rear axle.
  • The crank shaft turns the piston's up and down motion into circular motion just like a crank on a jack-in-the-box does.
  • One way of detecting a bent crank or a bent pedal spindle is to pedal backwards.
2 informal The drug methamphetamine.
More example sentences
  • He's assaulting the keys like Liberace on crank.
  • Think twice before banging crank.
  • Several nights ago I smoked crank, its probably the 4th or 5th time I've tried it now.

Origin

Old English cranc (recorded in crancstæf, denoting a weaver's implement), related to crincan (see cringe).

More definitions of crank

Definition of crank in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day conspicuous
Pronunciation: kənˈspɪkjʊəs
adjective
clearly visible

There are 3 definitions of crank in English:

crank2

Syllabification: crank
Pronunciation: /
 
kraNGk/

noun

1An eccentric person, especially one who is obsessed by a particular subject or theory: when he first started to air his views, they labeled him a crank [as modifier]: I am used to getting crank calls from conspiracy theorists
More example sentences
  • I've also been labelled the ‘eccentric crank of Eldwick’ by a party with an equally cranky name.
  • Their achievement is to have overcome being labelled cranks to make a real impact on the crucial environmental debate.
  • The consumption of sugar still goes up despite all the fanatical attacks from health cranks.
Synonyms
1.1North American A bad-tempered person.
[ mid 19th century: back-formation from cranky]
More example sentences
  • In fact, he became the worst crank and complainer I have ever seen even to the point of letting his temper erupt in public.
  • And everybody - save for a few old lefty cranks like me - will be content.
  • Maybe I'm some old crank complaining about hills and snow and how kids should take more cod liver these days.
2 literary A fanciful turn of speech.
[ late 16th century: perhaps from a base meaning 'bent together, curled up', shared by Old English cranc (see crank1)]

More definitions of crank

Definition of crank in:

There are 3 definitions of crank in English:

crank3

Syllabification: crank
Pronunciation: /
 
kraNGk/

adjective

Nautical, archaic
(Of a sailing ship) easily keeled over, especially by wind or sea through improper design or loading.
More example sentences
  • Imagine then, the situation of the Ranger's crew, with a top-heavy and crank ship under their feet.
  • The fact that she was crank when empty would not prove her to be an unstable ship when loaded.

Origin

early 17th century: perhaps from dialect crank 'weak, shaky' (compare with cranky or crank1).

More definitions of crank

Definition of crank in: