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credence

Syllabification: cre·dence
Pronunciation: /ˈkrēdəns
 
/

Definition of credence in English:

noun

1Belief in or acceptance of something as true: psychoanalysis finds little credence among laymen
More example sentences
  • That's a problem, because the credentials of professionals lend credence to their beliefs, however outrageous.
  • Because Bahamian society is small, insular and closed, it is possible for certain ideas to circulate, gain credence and become accepted as fact.
  • But seriously, there is credence in the belief that we fear what we do not know.
Synonyms
1.1The likelihood of something being true; plausibility: being called upon by the media as an expert lends credence to one’s opinions
More example sentences
  • The very fact that I visit this site and read these articles lends credence to the assumption that I do find useful and true ideas here.
  • It almost lends credence to the prosecution's case.
  • The record of systemic abuse of the program lends credence to claims that the oil-ministry list is genuine and should be investigated.
Synonyms
2 [usually as modifier] A small side table, shelf, or niche in a church for holding the elements of the Eucharist before they are consecrated: a credence table
More example sentences
  • I took the finger towel and glass cruets of water and wine to the credence table at the right of the altar and put out the bell on the step where I would be kneeling at the consecration.

Origin

Middle English: via Old French from medieval Latin credentia, from Latin credent- 'believing', from the verb credere.

Phrases

give credence to

1
Accept as true.
Example sentences
  • These are recipes that experts give credence to and experiments show work.
  • He was ‘most surprised that it would attack another dog’ but had to give credence to what had been said.
  • But by your logic, we shouldn't give credence to atomic theory (we cannot observe atoms), either.

Words that rhyme with credence

antecedence, impedance

Definition of credence in:

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