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daddy

Syllabification: dad·dy
Pronunciation: /ˈdadē
 
/

Definition of daddy in English:

noun (plural daddies)

informal
1One’s father.
Example sentences
  • I never thought I was a daddy's girl, that I put my father on a pedestal, but it seems I have.
  • The Sports Day Fathers race was a serious event with all the daddies togged out for the event!
  • He's doing much better now, but he clearly misses his daddy.
1.1The oldest, best, or biggest example of something: the daddy of all potholes
More example sentences
  • They're named after the daddy of them all, David Coleman, an English sports presenter.
  • Eddie is the daddy of the round-trip United fans - at the age of 90.
  • I am trying the daddy of all treatments - a Balinese synchronised massage.

Origin

early 16th century: from dad + -y2.

More
  • pope from (Old English):

    The word pope came via ecclesiastical Latin from ecclesiastical Greek papas ‘bishop, patriarch’, a variant of Greek pappas ‘father’. From the same root came Late Middle English papal and papacy, and mid 16th-century papist. Patriarch (Middle English) is from Old French patriarche, via ecclesiastical Latin from Greek patriarkhēs: formed from patria ‘family’ and arkhēs ‘ruling’. Patriot (late 16th century) and patriotic (mid 17th century) go back to a related Greek patris ‘fatherland’. These are connected with English papa (late 17th century) for ‘father’ and mum, all being based on the early babbling sounds produced by infants, as is daddy (Late Middle English). See also pattern

Words that rhyme with daddy

baddy, caddie, caddy, faddy, kabaddi, laddie, paddy

Definition of daddy in:

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