Definition of dawdle in English:

dawdle

Syllabification: daw·dle
Pronunciation: /ˈdôdl
 
/

verb

[no object]
  • 1Waste time; be slow: I couldn’t dawdle over my coffee any longer
    More example sentences
    • Don't dawdle - questions must reach us by next Wednesday.
    • The Greek international dawdled and as he did so his captain stepped out of midfield and waved his arms madly at him.
    • Not a lot of time for dawdling around in cafés and coffee bars today.
    Synonyms
    linger, dally, take one's time, be slow, waste time, idle; delay, procrastinate, stall, dilly-dally, lollygag
    archaic tarry
  • 1.1 [with adverbial of direction] Move slowly and idly: Ruth dawdled back through the woods
    More example sentences
    • We dawdled in the general direction of the city and then sat around in Bow looking down at the cars zizzing past at high speed.
    • There's not much to do here but fish, dive, watch the sun sizzle down into the Indian Ocean and to dawdle your bicycle along the island's one path.
    • It dawdles across the sky and sets slowly at a glancing angle.
    Synonyms
    amble, stroll, trail, walk slowly, move at a snail's pace
    informal mosey, toodle

Derivatives

dawdler

Pronunciation: /ˈdôd(ə)lər/
noun
More example sentences
  • On Sunday, two boys and two girls were mixing with the general gathering - window-shoppers, dawdlers, and so on - carrying signboards that said, ‘crazy sales’.
  • After a 2 minute shuffle of dawdlers assembling themselves, Ms. Fellcart flicked on the over-head projector and began jotting down the groups.
  • Dalliers, dawdlers and daydreamers learn to camouflage their lack of achievement in torrents of words.

Origin

mid 17th century: related to dialect daddle, doddle 'dally'.

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