Definition of deference in English:

deference

Syllabification: def·er·ence
Pronunciation: /ˈdefərəns
 
/

noun

Humble submission and respect: he addressed her with the deference due to age
More example sentences
  • Elizabeth II came to the throne when Britain still enjoyed a society where deference joined with self respect.
  • The prisoners were all perfectly submissive and paid every deference to the wishes of those in whose custody they were placed.
  • Even when this process is taking place, there is still a battle against old ideas and the habits of deference and submission.
Synonyms
respect, respectfulness, dutifulness; submissiveness, submission, obedience, surrender, accession, capitulation, acquiescence, complaisance, obeisance

Origin

mid 17th century: from French déférence, from déférer 'refer' (see defer2).

Phrases

in deference to

Out of respect for; in consideration of.
More example sentences
  • They either watch me march away or hurriedly dash to me with an immediate, apologetic and cursory check of my goods, in deference to my self-conferred diplomatic status.
  • The Good Friday procession, which symbolises Christ's path to his crucifixion, was modified in deference to the Pope's age and health.
  • The team was named Celtic, in deference to Brother Walfrid's wishes, who felt that this name would encompass both its Irish and Scottish roots.

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