There are 2 definitions of defile in English:

defile1

Syllabification: de·file
Pronunciation: /diˈfīl
 
/

verb

[with object]
1Sully, mar, or spoil: the land was defiled by a previous owner
More example sentences
  • The corridor was dirty, crimson stains defiling the walls.
  • He insists that no one touches Priest, a man of honor, even if he is leading the ‘foreign hordes’ who are defiling this great city.
  • We have allowed ourselves to be dirtied, to be defiled; and the worst of it is that we have done this to ourselves.
Synonyms
spoil, sully, mar, impair, debase, degrade; poison, taint, tarnish; destroy, ruin
1.1Desecrate or profane (something sacred): the tomb had been defiled and looted
More example sentences
  • He insisted that Jesus - who famously ejected money-changers from a temple for defiling a sacred place - would back him.
  • This has not been the case recently, as mindless youths disrespect, desecrate and defile the church and its surrounding area.
  • Atalanta and Hippomenes are changed to lions for defiling a sacred shrine.
Synonyms
desecrate, profane, violate; contaminate, pollute, debase, degrade, dishonor
1.2 archaic Violate the chastity of (a woman).
More example sentences
  • Every track appears to be addressed to a female, and these jousters are comfortable bragging about punching, kicking and shamelessly defiling the female in question.
  • You will never convert us to your religion and defile our women.
  • Maybe he had killed a guard or defiled the aristocrat's daughter.
Synonyms
rape, violate
literary ravish
dated deflower

Origin

late Middle English: alteration of obsolete defoul, from Old French defouler 'trample down', influenced by obsolete befile 'befoul, defile'.

Derivatives

defiler

noun
More example sentences
  • And we poets understand why Dante put the defilers of language into the seventh circle of his Hell.
  • Still I laughed, imagining the defiler, a disgruntled person with a black felt pen.
  • The women reiterated their commitment to fight child labour and urged Government to implement stiffer penalties for child defilers.

Definition of defile in:

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Word of the day setose
Pronunciation: ˈsiːtəʊs
adjective
bearing bristles or setae; bristly

There are 2 definitions of defile in English:

defile2

Syllabification: de·file
Pronunciation: /diˈfīl, ˈdēˌfīl
 
 
/

noun

A steep-sided, narrow gorge or passage (originally one requiring troops to march in single file).
More example sentences
  • In setting up fire pockets, an advantageous front line configuration is chosen, in gaps between strongholds, approaches to commanding heights, choke points, defiles, valleys, gorges, etc.
  • When fighting in the depths of enemy defenses the pressing sub-units concentrate on routing the enemy units defending roads and directions, defiles, narrow roads, and settlements.
  • Tanks, AT guns, and AT rocket launchers are commonly used at strong-points by troops defending road junctions, exits from valleys, gorges, tunnels, defiles, and crossings over mountain rivers.

verb

[no object] archaic Back to top  
(Of troops) march in single file: we emerged after defiling through the mountainsides

Origin

late 17th century: from French défilé (noun), défiler (verb), from 'away from' + file 'column, file'.

Definition of defile in:

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Word of the day setose
Pronunciation: ˈsiːtəʊs
adjective
bearing bristles or setae; bristly