Definition of demur in English:

demur

Syllabification: de·mur
Pronunciation: /dəˈmər
 
/

verb (demurs, demurring, demurred)

[no object]
1Raise doubts or objections or show reluctance: normally she would have accepted the challenge, but she demurred
More example sentences
  • ‘I'm not a very good close reader of my own work,’ she demurs when asked to explain the meaning of an incident near the end of The Namesake.
  • Yet Stevenson demurs mildly, and says diplomatically: ‘I think actors often improvise in character in a scripted film, so it's not that unusual.’
  • When asked the age of her son she cheerfully demurs, claiming with some justification that such questions are normally only asked as a way of deducing her own age - dangerous information, which most sopranos prefer to keep to themselves.
Synonyms
object, take exception, take issue, protest, cavil, dissent;
voice reservations, be unwilling, be reluctant, balk, think twice;
drag one's heels, refuse
informal boggle, kick up a fuss
1.1 Law , dated Put forward a demurrer.
More example sentences
  • The defendant could not have demurred to the plaintiff's declaration, which would have shown a perfectly good cause of action, and, unless the defendant set up something to defeat the claim, the action would have been maintainable.
  • The reference in the final sentence of this passage is to the fact that the claimants had not demurred to the ten heads of particulars pleaded by the newspaper in support of meaning, namely grounds for investigation.
  • It can be dealt with in the ordinary way and if the Judge who hears the matter thinks there is anything in it, well, it will proceed to trial or maybe the Commonwealth will demur or you will demur, as the case may be.

noun

[usually with negative] Back to top  
The action or process of objecting to or hesitating over something: they accepted this ruling without demur
More example sentences
  • Those of us who demur are labelled ‘self-haters’.
  • Much, and much of the best, criticism in the past decade has been thus motivated; we now know a poet less quaint, less demur, and more politically engaged than previous generations might have imagined.
  • Prudie has long felt that the reflexive, polite demur is not necessary when people are impertinently out of line, either with their advice or their questions.
Synonyms
objection, protest, protestation, complaint, dispute, dissent, opposition, resistance;
a murmur, a word

Origin

Middle English (in the sense 'linger, delay'): from Old French demourer (verb), demeure (noun), based on Latin de- 'away, completely' + morari 'delay'.

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