Definition of depravity in English:

depravity

Syllabification: de·prav·i·ty
Pronunciation: /dəˈpravədē
 
/

noun (plural depravities)

1Moral corruption; wickedness: a tale of wickedness and depravity
More example sentences
  • His work of this time conveyed disgust at the horrors of war and the depravities of a decadent society with unerring psychological insight and devastating emotional effect.
  • Set in a surrealist netherworld where eccentricities meet anarchy, the play plummets the audience into a landscape of Dali's well known paintings and into the depths and depravities of the artist's own subconscious.
  • The neighborhood's ‘infamy was so well known, that out-of-town visitors went there to see its depravities.’
Synonyms
1.1A wicked or morally corrupt act.
More example sentences
  • Who knows where this morally outrageous depravity might lead?
  • He daringly threw his body over hers to stop the depravity.
  • The author traces the child protection movement to a time when child abuse was seen as a depravity of the immigrant poor.
1.2 Christian Theology The innate corruption of human nature, due to original sin.
More example sentences
  • Therefore a God-given moral absolute is necessarily applied and essential to the well being of the human species, given the depravity of human nature as it presently stands.
  • His highlighting of the paradoxes arising from human free will, creativity and depravity made me keen to read on.
  • The author, opposing any doctrine of natural depravity, argued that all children are born ‘innocent,’ that is, equally capable of vice or virtue.

Origin

mid 17th century: alteration (influenced by deprave) of obsolete pravity, from Latin pravitas, from pravus 'crooked, perverse'.

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Pronunciation: fləˈdʒɪʃəs
adjective
(of a person or their actions) criminal; villainous