Definition of directive in English:

directive

Syllabification: di·rec·tive
Pronunciation: /dəˈrektiv
 
/

noun

An official or authoritative instruction: moral and ethical directives
More example sentences
  • If Community action is required, the Commission will proceed through directives rather than regulations.
  • State authorities have ignored court directives demanding certain prisoners be produced.
  • Everything is illegal unless approved by the government, thus the reason for such idiotic regulations and directives.
Synonyms

adjective

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Involving the management or guidance of operations: he is seeking a directive role in energy policy
More example sentences
  • But the system only worked because the United States was prepared to play a leading and directive role.
  • Are these rights in the South African Constitution viewed in effect by the Court as directive principles?
  • The Bank of Montreal was not prepared to do so and the terms of the order were not very directive towards the Bank.

Origin

late Middle English (as an adjective): from medieval Latin directivus, from direct- 'guided, put straight', from the verb dirigere (see direct).

Definition of directive in:

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