Definition of disgust in English:

disgust

Syllabification: dis·gust
Pronunciation: /disˈɡəst
 
/

noun

A feeling of revulsion or profound disapproval aroused by something unpleasant or offensive: the sight filled her with disgust some of the audience walked out in disgust
More example sentences
  • The show fanatics behind kept clucking in disgust and making noises of disapproval.
  • I left the cinema half an hour before the end of the film in disgust, anger and, quite frankly, boredom.
  • I am writing in disgust over plans to demolish the Library and replace it with flats.
Synonyms
revulsion, repugnance, aversion, distaste, nausea, abhorrence, loathing, detestation, odium, horror;
contempt, outrage

verb

[with object] Back to top  
Cause (someone) to feel revulsion or profound disapproval: I was disgusted with myself for causing so much misery (as adjective disgusted) a disgusted look
More example sentences
  • I'm absolutely disgusted by the behaviour of all the people concerned in this case.
  • Your ladyship should know about my beliefs and frankly your behaviour disgusts me.
  • I was disgusted, at such a serious moment and even horrific, how could he think of money.
Synonyms
revolt, repel, repulse, sicken, nauseate, turn someone's stomach
informal turn off, gross out

Origin

late 16th century: from early modern French desgoust or Italian disgusto, from Latin dis- (expressing reversal) + gustus 'taste'.

Derivatives

disgustedly

adverb
More example sentences
  • ‘I always remember him smelling of drink,’ she adds disgustedly.
  • ‘This is the richest country in the world and we have more problems than anyone,’ she says disgustedly.
  • ‘I can't believe I actually agreed to go to this,’ she said disgustedly.

Definition of disgust in: