There are 2 definitions of distemper in English:

distemper1

Syllabification: dis·tem·per
Pronunciation: /ˌdisˈtempər
 
/

noun

1A viral disease of some animals, especially dogs, causing fever, coughing, and catarrh.
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  • For example, parvovirus, distemper and rabies are diseases that can be vaccinated against.
  • Will the insurer cover routine wellness care, such as inoculations against distemper, rabies and other diseases?
  • The canine distemper virus causes a highly contagious disease in dogs known as distemper.
2 archaic Political disorder: an attempt to illuminate the moral roots of the modern world’s distemper
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  • The Hamlet world's distemper, she argues, stems mostly from the way the generational/political life cycle has been upset.
  • Another reason for stalemate (or decline, as the case may be) in the stock market is the political distemper created by the major political parties.
  • At the heart of the book is James's description of the democratic temperament, which I take to be a healthy corrective to the distemper that characterizes so much of politics today.

Origin

mid 16th century (originally in the sense 'bad temper', later 'illness'): from Middle English distemper 'upset, derange', from late Latin distemperare 'soak, mix in the wrong proportions', from dis- 'thoroughly' + temperare 'mingle'. Compare with temper. sense 1 dates from the mid 18th century.

Definition of distemper in:

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Word of the day hypnopompic
Pronunciation: ˌhɪpnə(ʊ)ˈpɒmpɪk
adjective
relating to the state immediately preceding waking up

There are 2 definitions of distemper in English:

distemper2

Syllabification: dis·tem·per
Pronunciation: /ˌdisˈtempər
 
/

noun

1A kind of paint using glue or size instead of an oil base, for use on walls or for scene-painting.
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  • The kitchen gleamed from the distemper Dad had painted on its walls in contrasting shades of green and pink.
  • The walls were painted with a water-based powder distemper, usually in grass green or primrose colour.
  • Paper was printed by hand using wooden blocks and distemper paint, which dried to a soft, matt finish.
1.1A method of mural and poster painting using this.
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  • We use camlin water colour for fine painting and distemper in general.
  • Come a ‘chaste art festival’, then the distemper art rules the roost in major spots.
  • Many of the artists, most particularly Vuillard, painted these in distemper and left them unlined and unvarnished, making them more fragile than oils on canvas.

verb

[with object] (often as adjective distempered) Back to top  
Paint (something) with distemper: the distempered roof timbers
More example sentences
  • At Wissett Lodge, her rented home in Suffolk, she and Duncan distempered the walls a brilliant blue, and dyed the chair-covers with coloured ink.
  • The bedroom walls were distempered a dark, shiny green, the curtains were green with spots on and the bedspread an uninspiring khaki.

Origin

late Middle English (originally as a verb in the senses 'dilute' and 'steep'): from Old French destemprer or late Latin distemperare 'soak'.

Definition of distemper in:

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Word of the day hypnopompic
Pronunciation: ˌhɪpnə(ʊ)ˈpɒmpɪk
adjective
relating to the state immediately preceding waking up