There are 4 definitions of dock in English:

dock1

Syllabification: dock
Pronunciation: /däk
 
/

noun

1North American A structure extending alongshore or out from the shore into a body of water, to which boats may be moored: the gangplank was lowered to the dock
More example sentences
  • It looked like an old beach house with its own spooky run-down dock and boat house to boot.
  • He built his own boat dock down in the lagoon for his 30-foot SeaRay powerboat.
  • She sat on the old boat dock soaking up the sunshine, after almost a week of rain she was ready for some sun.
1.1An enclosed area of water in a port for the loading, unloading, and repair of ships.
More example sentences
  • Once China lost control of its repair docks at Port Arthur, nothing could be done to put its damaged foreign-built ships back in service.
  • There, slowly sailing towards them was a large ship coming from the docks of Port Refuge.
  • I was working part-time at the docks, unloading the ship's cargo boxes and supplies.
Synonyms
1.2 (docks) A group of enclosed areas of water along with the wharves and buildings near them.
More example sentences
  • Blaise walked along the docks, holding his breath as the unfamiliar scent of fish reached his nose, making him gag.
  • At one point 16,000 dockers organised mobile pickets and closed the docks along the Thames.
  • The report recommends a maximum height of 12 storeys in underdeveloped areas such as around Heuston Station, Spencer Dock and the south docks.
1.3 short for dry dock.
More example sentences
  • We drive through the long tunnel until we reach the dry docks.
1.4 (also loading dock) A platform for loading or unloading trucks or freight trains.
More example sentences
  • As the convoy arrived at the dock, the lorry doors opened and the exhausted, terrified lambs poured out, trying desperately to stay upright and avoid trampling each other.
  • Each window is dimensionally similar to a loading dock.
  • Three separate tractor-trailer loading docks on two different levels can accommodate 36 trailers simultaneously.

verb

[no object] Back to top  
1(Of a ship) tie up at a dock, especially in order to load or unload passengers or cargo: the ship docked at San Francisco
More example sentences
  • New on the scene to help house Mississippi's homeless, a 490,000 passenger cruise ship docking next door in Mobile, Alabama.
  • She'd once heard, the cargo and mail ship docked every two weeks at Majdi.
  • When we arrive there, we will dock, unload our cargo, and change ships.
Synonyms
moor, berth, put in, tie up, anchor
1.1 [with object] Bring (a ship or boat) into a dock: the riverbank where the fur traders docked their boats
More example sentences
  • Over 15,500 boats were docked at these marinas.
  • The Quays welcomed two Galway Hooker sailing boats and a flotilla of sailing vessels were docked at Albert Basin.
  • They learn how to fish, including how to bait the hook, tie knots and rig tackle, even back up a trailer and dock a boat.
1.2(Of a spacecraft) join with a space station or another spacecraft in space.
More example sentences
  • After that both radar systems broke down which meant that we knew for certain the commander would have to dock with the Space Station manually.
  • He was Commander of Atlantis as it docked with the Russian space station Mir.
  • This shuttle would not even be docking with the International Space Station.
1.3Attach (a piece of equipment) to another: the user wants to dock a portable into a desktop computer
More example sentences
  • They lowered the module back into place and successfully docked it onto the Raptors hull.
  • Light-emitting diodes indicate that the system has been docked successfully.

Origin

late Middle English: from Middle Dutch, Middle Low German docke, of unknown origin.

Definition of dock in:

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Pronunciation: ˌantɪˈbɛləm
adjective
occurring or existing before a particular war…

There are 4 definitions of dock in English:

dock2

Syllabification: dock
Pronunciation: /
 
däk/

verb

[with object] (usually be docked)
1Deduct (something, especially an amount of money): their wages are docked for public displays of affection [with two objects]: he will be docked an hour’s pay
More example sentences
  • The scheme is operated by the employer, who docks the money each week and passes it to the charities.
  • After that event at school, his parents had grounded him for a month, and docked his allowance until Christmas.
  • If staff forget their swipe card they are sent home to retrieve it - and the pay is docked for the amount of time they spend going home to get it.
Synonyms
deduct, subtract, remove, debit, take off/away, garnish
informal knock off
reduce, cut, decrease
1.1Cut short (an animal’s tail): fifteen of the dogs had had their tails docked
More example sentences
  • Such dogs were exempt from taxes, and their owners docked the dogs' tails to document their occupation.
  • Aside from the schipperke's thick ruff, the most striking feature of the breed is its tail - or lack thereof, since the tail is typically docked.
  • If the tail must be docked, the breed standard dictates that no more than one third of the tail may be removed.
Synonyms
cut off, cut short, shorten, crop, lop; remove, amputate, detach, sever, chop off, take off

noun

Back to top  
1The solid bony or fleshy part of an animal’s tail, excluding the hair.
More example sentences
  • Jason grabbed the towels and spread them at the dog's tail and dock.
1.1The stump left after a tail has been docked.

Origin

late Middle English: perhaps related to Frisian dok 'bunch, ball (of string, etc.)' and German Docke 'doll'. The original noun sense was 'the solid part of an animal's tail', whence the verb sense 'cut short (an animal's tail)', later generalized to 'reduce, deduct'.

Definition of dock in:

There are 4 definitions of dock in English:

dock3

Syllabification: dock
Pronunciation: /
 
däk/

noun

(usually the dock)
The enclosure in a criminal court where a defendant is placed: the nine others in the dock face a combination of charges
More example sentences
  • He was flanked by two police officers and a court security officer as he stood in the glass-enclosed dock at Harrogate Magistrates Court.
  • The new initiative comes just months after a defendant leapt over the dock at Southend court and made a dash for freedom.
  • Another image on her studio workbench was of a very young man with his eyes downcast, sitting in a dock next to a court officer.

Origin

late 16th century: probably originally slang and related to Flemish dok 'chicken coop, rabbit hutch', of unknown origin.

Definition of dock in:

There are 4 definitions of dock in English:

dock4

Syllabification: dock
Pronunciation: /
 
däk/

noun

A coarse weed of temperate regions, with inconspicuous greenish or reddish flowers. The leaves are popularly used to relieve nettle stings.
  • Genus Rumex, family Polygonaceae
More example sentences
  • This is rarer and is usually caused by weeds such as nettles and docks, late flowering plants and fungal spores.
  • Pesticides, similarly, were unknown: docks, nettles and thistles were scythed away by hand just as they came into seed.
  • I was out with this dangerous looking implement this afternoon, cutting down nettles, rosebay and docks nearly as tall as I am.

Origin

Old English docce, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch dialect dokke.

Definition of dock in: